Wednesday, 28 June 2017

Best and Worst in Health and Healthcare – May 2017

In May, next generation therapies took the spotlight: brain-computer interfaces, brain training, tDCS, DNA vaccines, probiotics… Yet, they weren’t all successful.

Here’s the best and worst news of May.

The best

Brain–computer interface therapy for post-stroke motor rehabilitation

Functional recovery from motor disabilities can be a major challenge following stroke. A new study tested a new therapy for motor-related disabilities affecting the arm in hemiparetic stroke survivors. It consisted of an exoskeleton driven by a brain–computer interface (BCI) that used neural activity from the unaffected brain hemisphere to control the movement of the affected hand. By using BCI control to associate imagined hand movements with the opening and closing of the affected hand, participants would train the uninjured parts of their brain to take over movements that were previously controlled by the injured areas of the brain. This BCI-based therapy was shown to be effective in improving motor performance. Another important aspect of this study was the fact that this method was designed and configured for home-based neurorehabilitation. Its efficacy therefore showed that BCI-driven neurorehabilitation can be effectively delivered in the home environment.

A probiotic for IBS-associated depression

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects 11% of the world’s population and is commonly accompanied by psychiatric symptoms, namely depression and anxiety. The gut microbiota is increasingly acknowledged as a key player in IBS and, via the gut-brain axis, as a likely contributor to the development of the associated psychiatric disorders. Therefore, a new study aimed at evaluating the effects of a probiotic bacteria on anxiety and depression in patients with IBS. The probiotic Bifidobacterium longum NCC3001 (BL) was administered to 44 adults with IBS and anxiety and/or depression for 6 weeks. It was shown that patients who received the probiotic were more likely to have a reduction in depression scores (but not anxiety) and increased quality of life than patients in the placebo group. BL had no effect on IBS, indicating that the reduction in depression scores was not merely a consequence of a reduction in IBS symptoms. Through fMRI analysis, these effects were shown to be linked to changes in brain activation patterns reflecting an effect of the probiotic on the limbic system.

Brain training for chronic TBI

Brain training has shown beneficial effects in acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) therapy, but studies on its effects in chronic TBI are still lacking. Therefore, a new study aimed at determining how the injured brain responds to cognitive training months-to-years after injury. Subjects with chronic TBI received cognitive training for 8 weeks. Cortical thickness and brain connectivity were assessed as indicators of brain plasticity before training, immediately after training, and 3 months after training.

Results showed that cortical thickness and brain connectivity were improved after strategy-based reasoning training, which focused on selective attention, abstract reasoning, and other cognitive strategies. Importantly, these improvements were evident even 3 months after training was completed, indicating a sustained effect.

DNA vaccines for Alzheimer’s disease

DNA vaccines may be the next generation of vaccines. They are designed to induce the production of antigens through the action of genetically engineered DNA, thereby triggering a protective immunological response. Although they are not yet approved for human use, they have been showing interesting beneficial effects in pre-clinical research. A new study has tested a DNA A?42 trimer vaccine (targeting amyloid plaques) for its effect on experimental Alzheimer’s disease.

It was shown that DNA A?42 immunization produced a high antibody response and that the antibodies generated after vaccination were able to detect amyloid plaques in the brain, suggesting a promising preventive effect for Alzheimer’s disease.

Cannabinoids for age-related cognitive decline

The activity of the endocannabinoid system declines during aging, with the expression of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor and the levels of the major endocannabinoid (2-AG) being reduced in the brain of older animals. In a letter published in Nature Medicine, new data shows that a prolonged exposure to low doses of the cannabinoid delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the main psychoactive substance in cannabis) can reverse the age-related cognitive decline in mice, improving spatial memory, long-term memory and learning flexibility.

The effect was accompanied by an increase in synaptic density in the hippocampus and a restoration of hippocampal gene transcription to patterns similar to those of young animals. This indicates a potential beneficial effect of cannabinoids in treating age-related cognitive impairments.

The worst

Sleep disturbances may increase the risk of dementia

Sleep disturbances are known to contribute to an overall deterioration of health. An association between sleep disorders and the development of dementia has also been proposed. A new study aimed at determining if this association is indeed observable in population-based studies. A first phase of the study took place between 1984 and 1989, when data about the sleeping patterns of the participants was collected. The incidence of dementia in those participants was now assessed using data from health registries. It was found that the risk ratio for dementia was significantly higher in individuals with frequent sleep disturbances.

Maternal stress and fetal development

Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and urocortin (UCN) are two proteins with important roles in both human stress regulation and pregnancy. Therefore, a new study investigated the association between an acute stress response, social overload (as an indicator of chronic stress) and the levels of CRH and UCN in the amniotic fluid of healthy, second-trimester pregnant women. The analyzes revealed that an acute maternal stress response was not associated with increased levels of the two peptides, but that maternal chronic social overload and amniotic CRH were positively correlated. Amniotic CRH was found to be able to influence fetal growth albeit in a non-linear way. This indicates that, although acute maternal stress may not be as influential, chronic maternal stress may affect the production of molecules, such as CRH, that can potentially influence fetal development.

tDCS does not improve the effect of cognitive training

Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) has been suggested be able to enhance cognitive abilities when associated with cognitive training. This claim has been tested in a new study of 123 older adults, in whom the effects of 20 sessions of anodal tDCS over the left prefrontal cortex and simultaneous working memory training on cognitive performance was assessed. Results showed that tDCS failed to improve the efficacy of cognitive training. A meta-analysis including younger and older individuals was also performed. It also indicated that tDCS is not effective at improving the effect of cognitive training in working memory and global cognition. It is possible that the inefficacy of tDCS may be due to an inadequacy of current tDCS protocols for enhancing the effects of cognitive training, indicating that those protocols may need to be optimized.

The onset of cocaine addiction

Cues associated with the consumption of cocaine can lead to dopamine release in the striatum brain region. This response is believed to be associated with the the motivation to consume. The acquisition of drug-seeking behaviors is believed to be associated with conditioned dopamine responses in the ventral striatum. But as drug use continues and becomes a habit, the conditioned responses shift to the dorsal striatum, which may be associated with compulsive drug use and susceptibility to addiction. A new study used PET imaging and  personalized cocaine cues to assess the pattern of the dopamine response in in recreational cocaine users without a substance use disorder. The results showed that the exposure to cues associated with the opportunity to use the drug increased the dopamine response in the dorsal striatum in recreational cocaine users. This indicates that a susceptibility to addiction may be developing even though there are no psychiatric signs of a substance abuse disorder.

Inflammation and oxidation in Huntington’s disease

Chronic neuroinflammation and oxidative stress are believed to play an important role in driving Huntington’s disease progression. NRF2 is a transcription factor with a chief role in regulating cellular anti-inflammatory and antioxidant defense genes. A new study has reveled that NRF2 activation was suppressed in neural stem cells of Huntington’s disease patients, suggesting that these cells may be abnormally susceptible to oxidative stress. On the bright side, it was shown that the pharmacological activation of NRF2 was able to decrease inflammatory responses in glial cells, the main cellular mediators of neuroinflammation, and in blood monocytes from Huntington’s disease patients. These findings also suggest that NRF2 may be an important therapeutic target in Huntington’s disease.

References

Bilkei-Gorzo A, et al (2017). A chronic low dose of ?9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) restores cognitive function in old mice. Nat Med. doi: 10.1038/nm.4311. [Epub ahead of print]

Bundy DT, et al (2017). Contralesional Brain-Computer Interface Control of a Powered Exoskeleton for Motor Recovery in Chronic Stroke Survivors. Stroke. pii: STROKEAHA.116.016304. doi: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.116.016304. [Epub ahead of print]

Cox SML, et al (2017). Cocaine Cue-Induced Dopamine Release in Recreational Cocaine Users. Sci Rep, 7: 46665. doi:  10.1038/srep46665

Han K, et al (2017). Strategy-based reasoning training modulates cortical thickness and resting-state functional connectivity in adults with chronic traumatic brain injury. Brain Behav, 7(5):e00687. doi: 10.1002/brb3.687s.

La Marca-Ghaemmaghami P, et al (2017). Second-trimester amniotic fluid corticotropin-releasing hormone and urocortin in relation to maternal stress and fetal growth in human pregnancy. Stress, 21:1-10. doi: 10.1080/10253890.2017.1312336pregnanc. [Epub ahead of print]

“p1″>Lambracht-Washington D, et al (2017). Evaluation of a DNA A?42 vaccine in adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta): antibody kinetics and immune profile after intradermal immunization with full-length DNA A?42 trimer.Alzheimers Res Ther, 9(1):30. doi: 10.1186/s13195-017-0257-7.

Luojus MK, et al (2017).Self-reported sleep disturbance and incidence of dementia in ageing men. J Epidemiol Community Health, 71(4):329-335. doi: 10.1136/jech-2016-207764.

Nilsson J, et al (2017). Direct-Current Stimulation Does Little to Improve the Outcome of Working Memory Training in Older Adults. Psychol Sci. doi: 10.1177/0956797617698139. [Epub ahead of print]

Pinto-Sanchez MI, et al (2017).Probiotic Bifidobacterium longum NCC3001 Reduces Depression Scores and Alters Brain Activity: a Pilot Study in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome.Gastroenterology. pii: S0016-5085(17)35557-9. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2017.05.003. [Epub ahead of print]

Quinti L, et al (2017). KEAP1-modifying small molecule reveals muted NRF2 signaling responses in neural stem cells from Huntington’s disease patients.Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, pii: 201614943. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1614943114. [Epub ahead of print]

Image via DarkoStojanovic/Pixabay.

via Brain Blogger Read More Here..

Women need a rosy outlook? Then give us reason to be optimistic

Talking up the idea that women need to up their optimism to live longer is patronising in an age of stubborn gender inequality, says Lara Williams via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Force, Frequency of Head Hits Jump as Young Football Players Get Older

Findings confirm that these injuries are linked to level of play

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Source: HealthDay via Exercise for Children New Links: MedlinePlus RSS Feed Read More Here..

Why your real age may be older – or younger – than your years

Biological age can diverge from the number of years we celebrate on our birthdays - and it sheds light on the time we have left   via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why your real age may be older – or younger – than your years

Biological age can diverge from the number of years we celebrate on our birthdays - and it sheds light on the time we have left   via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

What Is 'Moderate' Exercise Anyway?

How to figure out the best intensity for you

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Source: HealthDay via Exercise and Physical Fitness New Links: MedlinePlus RSS Feed Read More Here..

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Painless flu jab patch for people scared of injections

The special sticking plaster delivers a pain-free 'do-it-yourself' dose of the vaccine into the skin. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Make-up artist offers free makeovers to cancer patients

Make-up artist Natalie Crawford lost her breasts, ovaries and hair due to chemotherapy and now offers free makeovers to cancer patients. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Tuesday, 27 June 2017

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Joint United Nations statement on ending discrimination in health care settings

The joint UN statement on ending discrimination in health care settings calls for health workers to fulfil their responsibilities, but also to have their rights protected. via WHO news Read More Here..

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Charlie Gard parents lose court appeal

Judges at European Court reject plea from parents of terminally-ill Charlie Gard to intervene in his case via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

'Pharma bro' Martin Shkreli fraud trial opens in New York

The former pharmaceutical chief denies operating a Ponzi-like scheme that cheated investors. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Canada nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer jailed for life for murders

A former Ontario nurse is sentenced to life in prison for killing eight elderly people in her care. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Why bird flu risk is like the Grenfell Tower tragedy

We know the dangers, we know how to mitigate them, and it won't even cost that much – but nobody in power seems to care via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Tick saliva 'gold mine' blocks killer heart condition

Oxford scientists are excited by the prospect of making a drug from a bug. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Suntans on children 'are not healthy'

A suntan is a sign of skin damage, not glowing health, NHS England and the Met Office remind parents. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Senate healthcare bill leaves 22m more without cover, CBO says

Millions of Americans could lose insurance under a Senate bill, a congressional report says. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Monday, 26 June 2017

What happens when you're sleep deprived?

A new study is looking at the impact of sleep on your brain power. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Magnets used to control flickering eyes

A case study has shown how magnetic implants in the eye can successfully control the movement of the eye. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Research on male animals prevents women from getting best drugs

Male and female mice differ in many ways – a finding that suggests women could be missing out on the best medical treatments, as most are tested on male animals via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Being Thin Could Boost Stress Fracture Risk in Female Runners

Researcher says less muscle mass can make leg bones more vulnerable to injury

HealthDay news image

Source: HealthDay via Exercise and Physical Fitness New Links: MedlinePlus RSS Feed Read More Here..

Would you give one of your kidneys to a stranger?

More and more people are donating their spare kidney to save the life of someone they’ve never met, a gesture that could end transplant waiting lists via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Would you give one of your kidneys to a stranger?

More and more people are donating their spare kidney to save the life of someone they’ve never met, a gesture that could end transplant waiting lists via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Middle-aged workers 'spend more time sitting than pensioners'

Researchers find 45 to 54-year-olds spend on average 7.8 hours per weekday sitting down. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Living near noisy roads could make it harder to get pregnant

Women who live near noisy roads are more likely to take 6 to 12 months to get pregnant, even when factors like poverty and pollution are taken into account via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Iran's drug problem: Addicts 'more than double' in six years

The number of people suffering addiction to narcotics in Iran has surged, local media report. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Out of control

Yemen cholera epidemic: 'I have never seen such suffering' via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Yemen faces world's worst cholera outbreak - UN

There are an estimated 5,000 new cases of cholera in Yemen every day, with 200,000 people affected. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

'Remarkable' drop in new HIV cases among men

Among gay and bisexual men, new diagnoses have fallen for the first time in England. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

NHS hernia mesh repairs 'leaving patients in chronic pain'

The mesh left one woman "screaming on all fours from the agonising pain". via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

'Asthma is a killer - it took away my miracle daughter'

The mother of a 10-year-old asthma victim calls for the condition to be taken more seriously. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Older fathers have 'geekier sons'

They are more focused, intelligent and less bothered about fitting in, say scientists. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Social media pressure is linked to cosmetic procedure boom

More must be done to protect young people from cosmetic procedure industry, a report says. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

NHS hernia mesh felt like 'scratching from inside'

Surgeons have warned the repair technique is leaving many patients in chronic pain. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

How Syrian refugees battle against cancer

Ammash, 4, has leukaemia and the funds for his treatment are running out. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Sunday, 25 June 2017

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Saturday, 24 June 2017

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Statement from UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake and WHO Director-General Margaret Chan on the cholera outbreak in Yemen as suspected cases exceed 200,000

The rapidly spreading cholera outbreak in Yemen has exceeded 200,000 suspected cases, increasing at an average of 5,000 a day. We are now facing the worst cholera outbreak in the world. via WHO news Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can heightened empathy be a bad thing?

The Boy Who Loved Too Much sheds new light on being human through the story of a boy with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Midge Ure and Tony Hadley back Kenny Thomas daughter appeal

Stars including Midge Ure, Kim Wilde and Tony Hadley supported singer Kenny Thomas' appeal. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Friday, 23 June 2017

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Kid, 4, steals show during sickle cell Derbyshire chat

Gabriel, 4, gets distracted on set during a Victoria Derbyshire discussion on sickle cell disease. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Radio powered by your own sweat hints at future of wearables 

A small skin patch harnesses enough power from sweat to run a radio for 48 hours. The same technology could be used to power health sensors of the future via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your guts

When a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Meet the designer making clothes for diabetic women

Natalie Balmain has type 1 diabetes and says the clothes she has designed will help women manage the condition. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your guts

When a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your guts

When a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Thursday, 22 June 2017

Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your guts

When a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Ebola virus burial teams 'saved thousands of lives'

A key part of reducing the number of Ebola deaths was ensuring safe burials, research says. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your guts

When a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your guts

When a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your guts

When a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your guts

When a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your guts

When a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Specific diabetes medications recommended to protect bone health

Research highlights treatment options for co-managing type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis

Related items from OnMedica

Osteoporosis - treatment options
Osteoporosis - primary prevention
Metformin lowers cardiac deaths better than other drugs
Drug could cut heart events by 26% in diabetics
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

How to extinguish the inflammation epidemic

Stress, obesity and poor diet trigger persistent inflammation, which can lead to heart disease and depression. We’re finally working out how to fight it via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Radio powered by your own sweat hints at future of wearables 

A small skin patch harnesses enough power from sweat to run a radio for 48 hours. The same technology could be used to power health sensors of the future via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Underused cancer test could improve treatment of colon cancer

Blood test for carcinoembryonic antigen could help determine whether to use chemotherapy

Related items from OnMedica

Aspirin linked to better colon cancer survival
Developing and using a tool to improve outcomes in colorectal cancer
Fifth of emergency bowel cancer cases had red flag symptoms
Long delay after FIT linked to higher risk of cancer
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Radio powered by your own sweat hints at future of wearables 

A small skin patch harnesses enough power from sweat to run a radio for 48 hours. The same technology could be used to power health sensors of the future via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Radio powered by your own sweat hints at future of wearables 

A small skin patch harnesses enough power from sweat to run a radio for 48 hours. The same technology could be used to power health sensors of the future via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Pioneering proton beam therapy for 10-year-old girl

Amelia Brome from Lancashire was diagnosed with cancer in January 2017. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Radio powered by your own sweat hints at future of wearables 

A small skin patch harnesses enough power from sweat to run a radio for 48 hours. The same technology could be used to power health sensors of the future via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Radio powered by your own sweat hints at future of wearables 

A small skin patch harnesses enough power from sweat to run a radio for 48 hours. The same technology could be used to power health sensors of the future via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Radio powered by your own sweat hints at future of wearables 

A small skin patch harnesses enough power from sweat to run a radio for 48 hours. The same technology could be used to power health sensors of the future via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Measuring muscle gap 'helps players back on their feet'

The technique was tested on Barcelona footballers and their prized muscles. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Don’t blame Instagram for the rise of botox and lip fillers

A new report rightly suggests that non-surgical cosmetic procedures need tighter regulation, but stumbles by blaming selfies and social media for their popularity via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Don’t blame Instagram for the rise of botox and lip fillers

A new report rightly suggests that non-surgical cosmetic procedures need tighter regulation, but stumbles by blaming selfies and social media for their popularity via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Don’t blame Instagram for the rise of botox and lip fillers

A new report rightly suggests that non-surgical cosmetic procedures need tighter regulation, but stumbles by blaming selfies and social media for their popularity via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Don’t blame Instagram for the rise of botox and lip fillers

A new report rightly suggests that non-surgical cosmetic procedures need tighter regulation, but stumbles by blaming selfies and social media for their popularity via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Don’t blame Instagram for the rise of botox and lip fillers

A new report rightly suggests that non-surgical cosmetic procedures need tighter regulation, but stumbles by blaming selfies and social media for their popularity via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Don’t blame Instagram for the rise of botox and lip fillers

A new report rightly suggests that non-surgical cosmetic procedures need tighter regulation, but stumbles by blaming selfies and social media for their popularity via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Smoking is finally dying out among young people in the UK and US

Now only 15.5 per cent of people in the UK are smokers. The largest declines have been seen in the first generation to grow up among anti-smoking laws via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Best evidence yet that Parkinson’s could be autoimmune disease

People with Parkinson's show an immune response to brain cell markers that suggests the condition could be caused by having an over-active immune system via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..