Wednesday, 17 January 2018

How community spirit helps a girl with autism and severe anxiety

A scheme to let parents close their streets to cars so children can play is hugely beneficial to one young resident, who has autism and severe anxiety. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

How nursing in the UK has changed

Nurses haven been an integral part of the NHS since its inception. Here they talk about what has changed. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Why are so many nurses quitting the NHS?

Why are so many nurses quitting the NHS? via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Tuesday, 16 January 2018

In-person clinic visits are being replaced with virtual visits at a rapid pace

From the NEJM:

What if health care were designed so that in-person visits were the second, third, or even last option for meeting routine patient needs, rather than the first?

At Kaiser Permanente, 52% of 100 million patient encounters each year are now “virtual visits”. It spends 25% of its annual $3.8 billion budget on information technology.

"Payment models are an obvious barrier to deemphasizing in-person visits, but every provider’s business success depends on market share. The best way to win market share is to design and deliver better care, then modify the payment system to support it. Moreover, payment systems are already evolving to support nonvisit care. For example, use of bundled payment programs and accountable care organizations — which reward nontraditional care delivery models that reduce spending and meet patients’ needs — is growing."

Patients are increasingly asking, “Isn’t there a way to do this without my having to drive to your office?”

References:

In-Person Health Care as Option B — NEJM http://bit.ly/2ASHHTZ
NEJM Interview — In-Person Health Care as Option B http://bit.ly/2D8we8w
5% of patients account for 50% of healthcare costs http://bit.ly/2CVtvLR via CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog More READ

Cost legacy of decades-old NHS blunders begins to rise

Experts say maternity wards are still making the same "avoidable errors". via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Employers urged to 'normalise' menopause in the workplace

A BBC survey found 70% of women did not tell their employers about their menopause symptoms. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Man ruptures throat by stifling a sneeze

Clamping your nose and mouth shut when you need to sneeze is dangerous, doctors warn the public. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Black Death 'spread by humans not rats'

Human body lice, rather than rat fleas, spread plague during the Black Death, a study simulating the outbreak suggests. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

What does NHS compensation pay for?

The Hord family were given an £8m settlement after an NHS mistake. But what does it pay for? via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

What 'Beads of Courage' mean to young cancer patients

Children undergoing cancer treatment receive beads to document their journey and one mum wants to expand the scheme. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Monday, 15 January 2018

UK sends medics to halt Rohingya diphtheria outbreak

There have been 4,000 suspected cases of diphtheria in the overcrowded refugee camps and at least 31 deaths. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Smartphone and Social Media Use in Lectures Makes Your Learn Less

Several studies have shown that problematic smartphone use (PSU) is related to detrimental outcomes, such as:

- worse psychological well-being
- higher cognitive distraction
- poorer academic outcomes

Problematic smartphone use (PSU) is strongly related to social media use.

The study participants were 415 Estonian university students aged 19-46 years (79% females).

Problematic smartphone use (PSU) and the frequency of social media use in lectures were negatively correlated with a deep approach to learning (defined as learning for understanding) and positively correlated with a surface approach to learning (defined as superficial learning).

Mediation analysis showed that social media use in lectures completely mediates the relationship between PSU and approaches to learning. These results indicate that the frequency of social media use in lectures might explain the relationships between poorer academic outcomes and PSU.

References:

Problematic Smartphone Use, Deep and Surface Approaches to Learning, and Social Media Use in Lectures. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 Jan 8;15(1). pii: E92. doi: 10.3390/ijerph15010092.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29316697?dopt=Abstract via CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog More READ

Coca-Cola to cut bottle size but increase price in face of sugar tax

Bottles of the famous fizzy drink will be smaller and more expensive from March onwards. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

London's January air quality 'best in 10 years'

The capital has breached air pollution limits by 6 January every year since 2008. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

'Being a teenage mother is so lonely'

New guidelines aim to cut UK teenage pregnancy rates which remain among the highest in Europe. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

French salmonella baby milk scandal 'affects 83 countries'

The boss of French firm Lactalis says up to 12 million boxes of formula are now subject to a recall. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Sri Lanka's president rejects move to allow women to buy alcohol

The president overrules a government decision to let women buy alcohol for the first time in decades. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Weston's tribute to 'remarkable' Falklands surgeon

The Falkands veteran says Surgeon Captain Rick Jolly saved his life and transformed field medicine. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

'Floating on air' after surgeons remove 19kg tumour

Watch surgeons as they remove a 19.5kg tumour from a woman's body. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Saturday, 13 January 2018

Living with Alzheimer's at the age of 30

"I'm not going to get better, I'm just going to get worse," says Daniel Bradbury. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Friday, 12 January 2018

Personality issue

Professionals are asking for earlier and better treatment for this poorly understood condition. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

The 3,000-mile trip for mental health

Jake Tyler began his epic expedition after suffering a "breakdown" in April 2016. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Magician Dynamo surprises Hampshire youth club

The world famous magician performs tricks at a youth club and offers its members some advice. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Thursday, 11 January 2018

CES 2018: Willow and Freemie breast pumps offer mums freedom

The battery-powered devices are designed to be worn more discreetly than traditional pumps. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Driving away depression

Like Minds: The little yellow car that's tackling depression. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Gig Buddies helps people with learning difficulties to go out

A charity pairs people with learning difficulties, who feel daunted by going to gigs, with volunteers. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

We've run out of beds, warn hospital bosses

NHS chiefs say care is being compromised as staff struggle to cope on unsafe and over-crowded wards. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Painting over loneliness - how art can beat the blues

A Singapore artist has taken to painting murals across the city to help alleviate her loneliness. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Wednesday, 10 January 2018

UN Environment and WHO agree to major collaboration on environmental health risks

UN Environment and WHO have agreed a new, wide-ranging collaboration to accelerate action to curb environmental health risks that cause an estimated 12.6 million deaths a year.

Today in Nairobi, Mr Erik Solheim, head of UN Environment, and Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of WHO, signed an agreement to step up joint actions to combat air pollution, climate change and antimicrobial resistance, as well as improve coordination on waste and chemicals management, water quality, and food and nutrition issues. The collaboration also includes joint management of the BreatheLife advocacy campaign to reduce air pollution for multiple climate, environment and health benefits. via WHO news Read More Here..

Sister shares graveside photo to encourage smear tests

A cancer victim's sister has shared a graveside picture to highlight the importance of smear tests. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Pharma giant Pfizer pulls out of research into Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's charities call the news a "heavy blow" to those living with dementia. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Bath hospital's giggle doctor making children smile

Dr Ding Dong entertains children in Bath's Royal United Hospital. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Doctors wouldn’t let my sister die

A car crash left Polly Kitzinger with devastating brain injuries. Her family was unable to persuade doctors to let her die. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Hearing hints

The signs you have a problem - and what you can do about it. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Most people who try one cigarette become daily smokers, study says

The study's authors say the research shows the "remarkable hold" cigarettes can establish after one experience. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Double amputee teen racing driver makes comeback

Having his legs amputated below the knee hasn't stopped Billy Monger getting back in the driving seat. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Is Worthing man the UK's fittest 76-year-old?

Ted Pollard once competed against Arnold Schwarzenegger in Mr Universe. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Tuesday, 9 January 2018

Danielle Lloyd on why she wants to gender select her next child

Danielle Lloyd has told BBC 5 live she wants to pick the gender of her next child. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Once-a-week pill for HIV ready for testing in people

Trials will begin in humans after successful tests of a slow-release oral tablet in pigs, say US researchers. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Daughter's death from sepsis 'will stay with me forever'

A mother describes the harrowing moment her 17-year-old daughter died suddenly of sepsis. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Male suicide: The sisters fighting for their dad

Emma and Toni on the five letters that could save another man like their dad. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Singing 'speeds up' recovery from post-natal depression

Mothers in group singing sessions with babies have faster improvement in symptoms, a study suggests. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Coconut oil

Coconut oil sales are rocketing, but is it a cholesterol-busting wonder food, or is this dangerous hype? via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Monday, 8 January 2018

WHO Director-General: invest in health to end plague in Madagascar

The Director-General of WHO has outlined his vision for a Madagascar free of plague epidemics during a three-day visit to the island nation that started on 7 January 2018.

"Madagascar can make plague epidemics a thing of the past through strategic investments in its health system – including better access to healthcare, improving preparedness, surveillance and response capabilities, and implementing the International Health Regulations," said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. via WHO news Read More Here..

'Raw water': A dangerous new health craze?

Start-ups in the US are charging up to £4 per litre of untreated spring water. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Apple investors urge action on 'smartphone addiction'

Two major shareholders are urging Apple to address the growing issue of smartphone addiction among youngsters. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

The child whose skin blisters at the slightest touch

Moin Younis goes through an excruciating skin care routine each day, that can last up to six hours. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Gaza conjoined twins survive separation surgery

Baby girls Farah and Haneen, joined at the abdomen, are separated after surgery in Saudi Arabia. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

What is 'Aussie' flu and should we be worried?

The NHS is braced for a bad flu season as the 'Australian' virus strain H3N2 dominates. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Middle-aged can reverse heart risk with exercise, study suggests

But there is a catch - it takes two years of aerobic exercise, four to five days a week, a study says. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..