Saturday, 24 June 2017

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Friday, 23 June 2017

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Kid, 4, steals show during sickle cell Derbyshire chat

Gabriel, 4, gets distracted on set during a Victoria Derbyshire discussion on sickle cell disease. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Synthetic iris could let cameras react to light like our eyes do

The iris in our eyes shrinks the pupil in bright light and enlarges it in the dark, and now an artificial version could do the same for both eyes and cameras via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Radio powered by your own sweat hints at future of wearables 

A small skin patch harnesses enough power from sweat to run a radio for 48 hours. The same technology could be used to power health sensors of the future via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your guts

When a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Meet the designer making clothes for diabetic women

Natalie Balmain has type 1 diabetes and says the clothes she has designed will help women manage the condition. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your guts

When a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your guts

When a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Thursday, 22 June 2017

Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your guts

When a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Ebola virus burial teams 'saved thousands of lives'

A key part of reducing the number of Ebola deaths was ensuring safe burials, research says. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your guts

When a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your guts

When a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your guts

When a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your guts

When a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your guts

When a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Specific diabetes medications recommended to protect bone health

Research highlights treatment options for co-managing type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis

Related items from OnMedica

Osteoporosis - treatment options
Osteoporosis - primary prevention
Metformin lowers cardiac deaths better than other drugs
Drug could cut heart events by 26% in diabetics
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

How to extinguish the inflammation epidemic

Stress, obesity and poor diet trigger persistent inflammation, which can lead to heart disease and depression. We’re finally working out how to fight it via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Radio powered by your own sweat hints at future of wearables 

A small skin patch harnesses enough power from sweat to run a radio for 48 hours. The same technology could be used to power health sensors of the future via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Underused cancer test could improve treatment of colon cancer

Blood test for carcinoembryonic antigen could help determine whether to use chemotherapy

Related items from OnMedica

Aspirin linked to better colon cancer survival
Developing and using a tool to improve outcomes in colorectal cancer
Fifth of emergency bowel cancer cases had red flag symptoms
Long delay after FIT linked to higher risk of cancer
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Radio powered by your own sweat hints at future of wearables 

A small skin patch harnesses enough power from sweat to run a radio for 48 hours. The same technology could be used to power health sensors of the future via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Radio powered by your own sweat hints at future of wearables 

A small skin patch harnesses enough power from sweat to run a radio for 48 hours. The same technology could be used to power health sensors of the future via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Pioneering proton beam therapy for 10-year-old girl

Amelia Brome from Lancashire was diagnosed with cancer in January 2017. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Radio powered by your own sweat hints at future of wearables 

A small skin patch harnesses enough power from sweat to run a radio for 48 hours. The same technology could be used to power health sensors of the future via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Radio powered by your own sweat hints at future of wearables 

A small skin patch harnesses enough power from sweat to run a radio for 48 hours. The same technology could be used to power health sensors of the future via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Radio powered by your own sweat hints at future of wearables 

A small skin patch harnesses enough power from sweat to run a radio for 48 hours. The same technology could be used to power health sensors of the future via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Measuring muscle gap 'helps players back on their feet'

The technique was tested on Barcelona footballers and their prized muscles. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Don’t blame Instagram for the rise of botox and lip fillers

A new report rightly suggests that non-surgical cosmetic procedures need tighter regulation, but stumbles by blaming selfies and social media for their popularity via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Don’t blame Instagram for the rise of botox and lip fillers

A new report rightly suggests that non-surgical cosmetic procedures need tighter regulation, but stumbles by blaming selfies and social media for their popularity via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Don’t blame Instagram for the rise of botox and lip fillers

A new report rightly suggests that non-surgical cosmetic procedures need tighter regulation, but stumbles by blaming selfies and social media for their popularity via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Don’t blame Instagram for the rise of botox and lip fillers

A new report rightly suggests that non-surgical cosmetic procedures need tighter regulation, but stumbles by blaming selfies and social media for their popularity via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Don’t blame Instagram for the rise of botox and lip fillers

A new report rightly suggests that non-surgical cosmetic procedures need tighter regulation, but stumbles by blaming selfies and social media for their popularity via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Don’t blame Instagram for the rise of botox and lip fillers

A new report rightly suggests that non-surgical cosmetic procedures need tighter regulation, but stumbles by blaming selfies and social media for their popularity via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Smoking is finally dying out among young people in the UK and US

Now only 15.5 per cent of people in the UK are smokers. The largest declines have been seen in the first generation to grow up among anti-smoking laws via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Best evidence yet that Parkinson’s could be autoimmune disease

People with Parkinson's show an immune response to brain cell markers that suggests the condition could be caused by having an over-active immune system via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Wednesday, 21 June 2017

Smoking is finally dying out among young people in the UK and US

Now only 15.5 per cent of people in the UK are smokers. The largest declines have been seen in the first generation to grow up among anti-smoking laws via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Best evidence yet that Parkinson’s could be autoimmune disease

People with Parkinson's show an immune response to brain cell markers that suggests the condition could be caused by having an over-active immune system via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Peace at last

Fifteen years ago there was no such thing as palliative care - care for the dying - in Mongolia. Now there is, thanks to Odontuya Davaasuren. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Smoking is finally dying out among young people in the UK and US

Now only 15.5 per cent of people in the UK are smokers. The largest declines have been seen in the first generation to grow up among anti-smoking laws via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Best evidence yet that Parkinson’s could be autoimmune disease

People with Parkinson's show an immune response to brain cell markers that suggests the condition could be caused by having an over-active immune system via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Smoking is finally dying out among young people in the UK and US

Now only 15.5 per cent of people in the UK are smokers. The largest declines have been seen in the first generation to grow up among anti-smoking laws via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Best evidence yet that Parkinson’s could be autoimmune disease

People with Parkinson's show an immune response to brain cell markers that suggests the condition could be caused by having an over-active immune system via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Smoking is finally dying out among young people in the UK and US

Now only 15.5 per cent of people in the UK are smokers. The largest declines have been seen in the first generation to grow up among anti-smoking laws via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..