Thursday, 17 April 2014

Merck's ragweed pollen allergy drug gets U.S. approval

A view shows the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) logo at its headquarters in Silver Spring (Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Merck & Co's pollen allergy drug Ragwitek. The tablet, which is administered by placing it under the tongue, is to treat the short ragweed pollen induced allergic rhinitis. Merck's Ragwitek will compete with Stallergenes SA's immunotherapy treatment for five types of grass pollen, which was approved by the FDA earlier this month.




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UnitedHealth: New hepatitis C drug costs far more than forecast

(Reuters) - UnitedHealth Group Inc, the largest U.S. health insurer, said it spent more than $100 million to cover a pricey new hepatitis C drug from Gilead Sciences Inc in its first three months on the market, an amount that was "multiple" times what it had expected.















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15 Essential Rules For Choosing A Restaurant

And for getting the most out of your experience.



If you see chefs smoking outside the front door, keep walking.


Because that place doesn't value the customer, I promise you.


Via giphy.com



Toilets tell you a lot.


If the bathrooms are a state, why should the kitchen be any different? Also: No running water in the bathroom? RUN.


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Don’t be fooled by the cutesy decor.


The cleanliness of a restaurant is important (see toilets above), but the look of it doesn't always reflect the quality of the food. Let’s call it "the Paris effect," in honor of the first restaurant everyone stumbles across in Paris, a romantic brasserie just off the Champs-Élysées with red roses on the tables and charming art on the walls and the worst slop you’ve ever eaten.


Via giphy.com



Be wary of a chef with a dirty uniform.


A little bit of dirt is par for the course when you’re working with food all day. But an "I've just slept in a dumpster" catalog of stains on a chef's whites (aka uniform) spells all kinds of trouble.


Via giphy.com




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46 Thoughts People Have While Getting Tacos At 2 A.M.

Anytime is a good time for a taco al pastor .


1. I am officially drunk.

2. I am also officially hungry.

3. It's exactly 2:02 a.m.

4. I could go to sleep or...

5. I COULD EAT SOME FUCKING TACOS!!!!



MGM


6. I will only get two tacos.

7. Two tacos al pastor and that's it.

8. I'm on a diet.

9. Diet has the word "die" in it.

10. Whoa! Look at that thing...



ciudaddemexico.olx.com.mx




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25 Unmissable Coffee Shops In London

How do you take yours?



@sateenlaulu on Instagram



@wuthecleaner on Instagram



@shubhashish on Instagram




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Info may prompt seniors to taper off sleeping pills

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Older people are willing and able to get themselves off medications like sleeping pills once they're informed of the potential harms, according to a new Canadian study.



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Why we get autism but our Neanderthal cousins didn't

First maps of gene expression in Neanderthals and Denisovans could explain why they looked different from us – and why autism may be unique to humans













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Info may prompt seniors to taper off sleeping pills

By Anne Harding NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Older people are willing and able to get themselves off medications like sleeping pills once they're informed of the potential harms, according to a new Canadian study. "Even among patients who have been taking sleeping pills for 30 years, many of them in their 80s and 90s were able to get off the sleeping pills once they realized that these pills could cause falls, memory problems and car accidents," lead author Dr. Cara Tannenbaum of the University of Montreal Reuters Health. While Valium, Xanax and similar medications, known as benzodiazepines, are not recommended for older adults given such risks, up to one-third of older adults still take them, usually to treat insomnia or anxiety, according to Tannenbaum and her colleagues. Doctors know about the dangers these drugs pose to their patients, the investigators write in JAMA Internal Medicine, but nearly half say they renew benzodiazepine prescriptions for their older patients anyhow, "citing patient dependence and benefit as justifications." Tannenbaum's team wanted to see whether educating older patients taking benzodiazepines about the risks would be an effective way to encourage some to stop using the drugs. via Health News Headlines - Yahoo News Read More Here..

Brutish and short? DNA 'switch' sheds light on Neanderthals

Hundreds of Neanderthals' genes were turned off while the identical genes in today's humans are turned on, the international team announced in a paper published online in Science. They also found that hundreds of other genes were turned on in Neanderthals, but are off in people living today. Among the hundreds: genes that control the shape of limbs and the function of the brain, traits where modern humans and Neanderthals differ most. "People are fundamentally interested in what makes us human, in what makes us different from Neanderthals," said Sarah Tishkoff, an expert in human evolution at the University of Pennsylvania, who was not involved in the new study. via Health News Headlines - Yahoo News Read More Here..

Arabian Knives: Working the OR in the Middle East

(MedPage Today) -- As an epidemic of obesity and diabetes surges in the Persian Gulf states, a bariatric surgeon from New York recently packed up his scalpel to lend a steady hand. via MedPageToday.com - medical news plus CME for physicians Read More Here..

Brutish and short? DNA 'switch' sheds light on Neanderthals

NEW YORK (Reuters) - How can creatures as different in body and mind as present-day humans and their extinct Neanderthal cousins be 99.84 percent identical genetically?















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Creative Pursuits Might Boost Your Job Performance

Study finds association between self-expression, improved problem-solving skills via Resurrection Health Care - Daily News More READ

Quarter of Prostate Cancer Patients May Abandon 'Watchful Waiting' Approach

European study tracked how many men came back for regular checkups over 13 years via Resurrection Health Care - Daily News More READ

Off Season May Not Be Long Enough to Recover From Football 'Hits'

Study found some players still showed brain changes 6 months after season had ended via Resurrection Health Care - Daily News More READ

Health Highlights: April 17, 2014

Guinea Ebola Outbreak Caused by New Virus Strain: Researchers, Miley Cyrus in Hospital After Reaction to Antibiotics, Actress Valerie Harper Says She's Cancer-Free via Resurrection Health Care - Daily News More READ

Salmonella decline seen in food poisoning report

NEW YORK (AP) — The government's latest report card on food poisoning is out, and it has some good news: a drop in illnesses from salmonella. via Health News Headlines - Yahoo News Read More Here..

California sees Obamacare surge as open enrollment ends for 2014

A man looks over the Affordable Care Act signup page on the HealthCare.gov website in New York in this photo illustration Thanks to a final April surge, California's Obamacare marketplace enrolled a total of 1.4 million people in private health insurance plans, state officials announced on Thursday, beating a federal forecast by just over 800,000 enrollees. California's Obamacare enrollments are among 7.5 million people nationally who have signed up, according to federal officials. Peter V. Lee, executive director of Covered California, the state's Obamacare health insurance marketplace, called that "a huge number" and said enrollees "are part of history." The country's first open enrollment period for coverage under President Barack Obama's healthcare reform law ended in most states on March 31. California and a handful of others kept their doors open longer, citing technical difficulties that kept some customers from accessing Obamacare websites.




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About 12 million U.S. outpatients misdiagnosed annually -study

(Reuters) - Roughly 12 million adults who visit U.S. doctors' offices and other outpatient settings, or one in 20, are misdiagnosed every year, a new study has found, and half of those errors could lead to serious harm.



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Stroke Rounds: Depression Tied to Worse Stroke Outcomes (CME/CE)

(MedPage Today) -- Depression was found to be a significant and independent risk factor for poor stroke outcomes in a study from the U.K., and recovery from depression within a year did not alter long-term risk. via MedPageToday.com - medical news plus CME for physicians Read More Here..

Water from Oregon reservoir tests clean

The Mount Tabor number 1 reservoir in Portland, Ore., is seen in a June 20, 2011 photo. Portland officials said Wednesday, April 16, 2014 that they are flushing away millions of gallons of treated water for the second time in less than three years because someone urinated into a city reservoir. In June 2011, the city drained a 7.5 million-gallon reservoir at Mount Tabor in southeast Portland. This time, 38 million gallons from a different reservoir at the same location will be discarded after a 19-year-old was videotaped in the act (AP Photo/The Oregonian, Benjamin Brink) PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — There's nothing wrong with the 38 million gallons of water being flushed away from a reservoir in an Oregon city.




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Wall Street edges higher during earnings flurry

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange By Rodrigo Campos NEW YORK (Reuters) - Stocks advanced slightly in choppy trading on Thursday after three days of gains, as underwhelming results from tech bellwethers Google and IBM were offset by upbeat quarterly numbers, including those from Morgan Stanley and General Electric. The latest data showed the U.S. economy's health was improving. The combined reported and expected earnings-per-share growth estimate for S&P 500 components rose to 1.7 percent from Wednesday's 0.6 percent, Thomson Reuters data showed, indicating most companies that reported results in the past 24 hours exceeded expectations. The technology sector capped the S&P 500's gain, with Google shares down 3.2 percent at $545.81 and IBM off 3.2 percent at $190.28 after both reported earnings late Wednesday that failed to impress Wall Street.




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About 12 million U.S. outpatients misdiagnosed annually -study

Devices used to take blood pressure, temperature, and examine eyes and ears rest on a wall inside of a doctor's office in New York Roughly 12 million adults who visit U.S. doctors' offices and other outpatient settings, or one in 20, are misdiagnosed every year, a new study has found, and half of those errors could lead to serious harm. The study by a team of Texas-based researchers attempted to estimate how often diagnostic errors occur in outpatient settings such as doctors' offices and clinics, as exact figures don't exist. Efforts to improve patient safety have largely focused on inpatient hospital care, including programs introduced by President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act, even though most diagnoses are made in outpatient clinics, the study said. "It's important to outline the fact that this is a problem," said Dr. Hardeep Singh, the study's lead author and a patient safety researcher at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and at the Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, also in Houston.




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MRI Scan may Now Detect Brown Fat!

Brown fat may now be detected in a living adult thanks to a new MRI, which could be the first step into development of therapies for obesity and diabetes. Researchers from Warwick Medical School and University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust used a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based method to identify and confirm the presence of brown adipose tissue in a living adult. Brown fat has become a hot topic for scientists due its ability ...

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