Friday, 18 August 2017

Netflix vegan hit What the Health serves up lots of bad science

Campaigning vegans will change nothing if they embrace bad science and conspiracy theories when making the health case for their diet, says Anthony Warner via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can’t stop procrastinating? Try cognitive behaviour therapy

Do you find yourself doing absolutely any task other than the one at the top of your to-do list? There might now be a way to treat procrastination via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can’t stop procrastinating? Try cognitive behaviour therapy

Do you find yourself doing absolutely any task other than the one at the top of your to-do list? There might now be a way to treat procrastination via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can’t stop procrastinating? Try cognitive behaviour therapy

Do you find yourself doing absolutely any task other than the one at the top of your to-do list? There might now be a way to treat procrastination via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can’t stop procrastinating? Try cognitive behaviour therapy

Do you find yourself doing absolutely any task other than the one at the top of your to-do list? There might now be a way to treat procrastination via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Can’t stop procrastinating? Try cognitive behaviour therapy

Do you find yourself doing absolutely any task other than the one at the top of your to-do list? There might now be a way to treat procrastination via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Genetic test helps people avoid statins that may cause them pain

Many people who take statins ditch them due to painful side effects. But genetic testing can help choose the right drug, minimising this risk via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Genetic test helps people avoid statins that may cause them pain

Many people who take statins ditch them due to painful side effects. But genetic testing can help choose the right drug, minimising this risk via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Stem cell technique could reverse a major type of infertility

Men with extra sex chromosomes can have difficulty producing fertile sperm. Now researchers have got around this in mice by making stem cells from their skin via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Stem cell technique could reverse a major type of infertility

Men with extra sex chromosomes can have difficulty producing fertile sperm. Now researchers have got around this in mice by making stem cells from their skin via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Stem cell technique could reverse a major type of infertility

Men with extra sex chromosomes can have difficulty producing fertile sperm. Now researchers have got around this in mice by making stem cells from their skin via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Stem cell technique could reverse a major type of infertility

Men with extra sex chromosomes can have difficulty producing fertile sperm. Now researchers have got around this in mice by making stem cells from their skin via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Stem cell technique could reverse a major type of infertility

Men with extra sex chromosomes can have difficulty producing fertile sperm. Now researchers have got around this in mice by making stem cells from their skin via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Stem cell technique could reverse a major type of infertility

Men with extra sex chromosomes can have difficulty producing fertile sperm. Now researchers have got around this in mice by making stem cells from their skin via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Stem cell technique could reverse a major type of infertility

Men with extra sex chromosomes can have difficulty producing fertile sperm. Now researchers have got around this in mice by making stem cells from their skin via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Stem cell technique could reverse a major type of infertility

Men with extra sex chromosomes can have difficulty producing fertile sperm. Now researchers have got around this in mice by making stem cells from their skin via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Stem cell technique could reverse a major type of infertility

Men with extra sex chromosomes can have difficulty producing fertile sperm. Now researchers have got around this in mice by making stem cells from their skin via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Stem cell technique could reverse a major type of infertility

Men with extra sex chromosomes can have difficulty producing fertile sperm. Now researchers have got around this in mice by making stem cells from their skin via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Thursday, 17 August 2017

Stem cell technique could reverse a major type of infertility

Men with extra sex chromosomes can have difficulty producing fertile sperm. Now researchers have got around this in mice by making stem cells from their skin via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Stem cell technique could reverse a major type of infertility

Men with extra sex chromosomes can have difficulty producing fertile sperm. Now researchers have got around this in mice by making stem cells from their skin via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Stem cell technique could reverse a major type of infertility

Men with extra sex chromosomes can have difficulty producing fertile sperm. Now researchers have got around this in mice by making stem cells from their skin via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Stem cell technique could reverse a major type of infertility

Men with extra sex chromosomes can have difficulty producing fertile sperm. Now researchers have got around this in mice by making stem cells from their skin via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Stem cell technique could reverse a major type of infertility

Men with extra sex chromosomes can have difficulty producing fertile sperm. Now researchers have got around this in mice by making stem cells from their skin via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Stem cell technique could reverse a major type of infertility

Men with extra sex chromosomes can have difficulty producing fertile sperm. Now researchers have got around this in mice by making stem cells from their skin via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Vitamin C helps genes to kill off cells that would cause cancer

Many blood cancers are caused by mutations in the protective TET2 gene, but vitamin C may enhance drug treatments by helping to tell out-of-control cells to stop dividing via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Vitamin C helps genes to kill off cells that would cause cancer

Many blood cancers are caused by mutations in the protective TET2 gene, but vitamin C may enhance drug treatments by helping to tell out-of-control cells to stop dividing via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death

People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death

People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Peanut allergy treatment 'lasts up to four years'

Four years after children in a study took the oral treatment, 70% had no allergic reaction to peanuts. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Netflix vegan hit What the Health serves up lots of bad science

Campaigning vegans will change nothing if they embrace bad science and conspiracy theories when making the health case for their diet, says Anthony Warner via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Tiny robots crawl through mouse’s stomach to heal ulcers

Bacterial infections in mice have been cleared up by bubble-propelled micromotors that swim through the stomach and release antibiotic payloads - and then dissolve in stomach acid via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Speedy test for Lyme disease could help us treat it in time

Lyme disease needs to be treated quickly, but it can be hard to tell it apart from other conditions. Now a test could help diagnose the infection via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Speedy test for Lyme disease could help us treat it in time

Lyme disease needs to be treated quickly, but it can be hard to tell it apart from other conditions. Now a test could help diagnose the infection via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Speedy test for Lyme disease could help us treat it in time

Lyme disease needs to be treated quickly, but it can be hard to tell it apart from other conditions. Now a test could help diagnose the infection via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Speedy test for Lyme disease could help us treat it in time

Lyme disease needs to be treated quickly, but it can be hard to tell it apart from other conditions. Now a test could help diagnose the infection via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Speedy test for Lyme disease could help us treat it in time

Lyme disease needs to be treated quickly, but it can be hard to tell it apart from other conditions. Now a test could help diagnose the infection via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Speedy test for Lyme disease could help us treat it in time

Lyme disease needs to be treated quickly, but it can be hard to tell it apart from other conditions. Now a test could help diagnose the infection via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Speedy test for Lyme disease could help us treat it in time

Lyme disease needs to be treated quickly, but it can be hard to tell it apart from other conditions. Now a test could help diagnose the infection via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Speedy test for Lyme disease could help us treat it in time

Lyme disease needs to be treated quickly, but it can be hard to tell it apart from other conditions. Now a test could help diagnose the infection via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Speedy test for Lyme disease could help us treat it in time

Lyme disease needs to be treated quickly, but it can be hard to tell it apart from other conditions. Now a test could help diagnose the infection via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Speedy test for Lyme disease could help us treat it in time

Lyme disease needs to be treated quickly, but it can be hard to tell it apart from other conditions. Now a test could help diagnose the infection via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Speedy test for Lyme disease could help us treat it in time

Lyme disease needs to be treated quickly, but it can be hard to tell it apart from other conditions. Now a test could help diagnose the infection via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Speedy test for Lyme disease could help us treat it in time

Lyme disease needs to be treated quickly, but it can be hard to tell it apart from other conditions. Now a test could help diagnose the infection via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Speedy test for Lyme disease could help us treat it in time

Lyme disease needs to be treated quickly, but it can be hard to tell it apart from other conditions. Now a test could help diagnose the infection via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Wednesday, 16 August 2017

Speedy test for Lyme disease could help us treat it in time

Lyme disease needs to be treated quickly, but it can be hard to tell it apart from other conditions. Now a test could help diagnose the infection via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Speedy test for Lyme disease could help us treat it in time

Lyme disease needs to be treated quickly, but it can be hard to tell it apart from other conditions. Now a test could help diagnose the infection via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Banking a baby’s cord blood may save their life. Is it worth it?

Parents are paying huge sums to save umbilical cord blood for future medical treatments, but they may have to wait decades for the investment to pay off via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

I paid £2000 to bank my son’s cord blood, but couldn’t use it

An anonymous father says after storing the expensive cells, his son developed a condition that the blood could not treat via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Netflix vegan hit What the Health serves up lots of bad science

Campaigning vegans will change nothing if they embrace bad science and conspiracy theories when making the health case for their diet, says Anthony Warner via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Activated charcoal drug can protect microbiome from antibiotics

A special formulation of activated charcoal can soak up excess antibiotics, protecting beneficial gut bacteria and potentially preventing diarrhoea via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Could Big Lifestyle Changes Be Key to Managing Type 2 Diabetes?

Study finds lower blood sugar, reduced need for medication

HealthDay news image

Source: HealthDay via Exercise and Physical Fitness New Links: MedlinePlus RSS Feed Read More Here..

Chemical controllers: How hormones influence your body and mind

Does testosterone make men bald? Is there a love hormone? Do pregnancy hormones turn your brain to mush? New Scientist sifts the facts from the fiction via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Tiny robots crawl through mouse’s stomach to release antibiotics

Bubble-powered micromotors have treated infections in mice by swimming through the stomach to antibiotics. These could be a better way to treat stomach ulcers. via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Tiny robots crawl through mouse’s stomach to release antibiotics

Bubble-powered micromotors have treated infections in mice by swimming through the stomach to antibiotics. These could be a better way to treat stomach ulcers. via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

England will need over 71,000 extra care home places by 2025

The number of older people who will need substantial care is set to rise by 85.7 per cent, as increases in “healthspan” continue to lag behind longer lifespans via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

England will need over 71,000 extra care home places by 2025

The number of older people who will need substantial care is set to rise by 85.7 per cent, as increases in “healthspan” continue to lag behind longer lifespans via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death

People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

England will need over 71,000 extra care home places by 2025

The number of older people who will need substantial care is set to rise by 85.7 per cent, as increases in “healthspan” continue to lag behind longer lifespans via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death

People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

England will need over 71,000 extra care home places by 2025

The number of older people who will need substantial care is set to rise by 85.7 per cent, as increases in “healthspan” continue to lag behind longer lifespans via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death

People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

England will need over 71,000 extra care home places by 2025

The number of older people who will need substantial care is set to rise by 85.7 per cent, as increases in “healthspan” continue to lag behind longer lifespans via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death

People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

England will need over 71,000 extra care home places by 2025

The number of older people who will need substantial care is set to rise by 85.7 per cent, as increases in “healthspan” continue to lag behind longer lifespans via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death

People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death

People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death

People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death

People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

England will need over 71,000 extra care home places by 2025

The number of older people who will need substantial care is set to rise by 85.7 per cent, as increases in “healthspan” continue to lag behind longer lifespans via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death

People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death

People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death

People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death

People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death

People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death

People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death

People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Tuesday, 15 August 2017

Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death

People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Cold comfort: How chilling the lungs could beat heart attacks

If you can't restart a stopped heart within 5 minutes, brain damage starts. But using the lungs as a heat exchanger to chill the blood may buy us more time via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Cold comfort: How chilling the lungs could beat heart attacks

If you can't restart a stopped heart within 5 minutes, brain damage starts. But using the lungs as a heat exchanger to chill the blood may buy us more time via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

How US diplomats may have been attacked by sonic weapons in Cuba

Acoustic weapons are shrouded in mystery - now, US and Canadian diplomats seem to be suffering from the symptoms of an attack. Here's what could have happened via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Apology over Indian blood donation 'embarrassment'

A "communication breakdown" meant 100 members of the Indian community were not allowed to give blood. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Director-General leads WHO delegation to the Belt and Road Forum for Health Cooperation

WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus will lead WHO’s delegation to the Belt and Road High Level Meeting for Health Cooperation: Towards a Health Silk Road to be held in Beijing, 18–19 August 2017, as part of his first official visit to the People’s Republic of China since taking office on 1 July 2017.

Dr Tedros’ visit is to establish a new vision for WHO-China strategic partnership for the next 5–7 years. He will meet with high level leadership in the State Council; National Health and Family Planning Commission; Ministries of Foreign Affairs and Commerce; and the Government of China. Topics to be discussed during their meetings will include how best to utilize the Belt and Road initiative to keep people safe, how to advance universal health coverage in the countries included in the initiative, and to discuss more broadly the role of China in global health. via WHO news Read More Here..

Why your real age may be older – or younger – than your years

Biological age can diverge from the number of years we celebrate on our birthdays - and it sheds light on the time we have left   via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Even ‘healthy’ overweight people have a higher cardiac risk

Being overweight or obese is linked to coronary heart disease and heart attacks even when a person has healthy blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Plants 'hijacked' to make polio vaccine

A breakthrough could lead to easier, faster and cheaper vaccines. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Japanese fungus spreading in UK hospitals

More than 200 patients have been infected, but none has died, Public Health England confirms. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

'Fat but fit' still risk heart disease

Even if medical tests don't show up any problems, being overweight is bad for the heart, experts say. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Even ‘healthy’ overweight people have a higher cardiac risk

Being overweight or obese is linked to coronary heart disease and heart attacks even when a person has healthy blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Even ‘healthy’ overweight people have a higher cardiac risk

Being overweight or obese is linked to coronary heart disease and heart attacks even when a person has healthy blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Even ‘healthy’ overweight people have a higher cardiac risk

Being overweight or obese is linked to coronary heart disease and heart attacks even when a person has healthy blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Even ‘healthy’ overweight people have a higher cardiac risk

Being overweight or obese is linked to coronary heart disease and heart attacks even when a person has healthy blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Even ‘healthy’ overweight people have a higher cardiac risk

Being overweight or obese is linked to coronary heart disease and heart attacks even when a person has healthy blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Even ‘healthy’ overweight people have a higher cardiac risk

Being overweight or obese is linked to coronary heart disease and heart attacks even when a person has healthy blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Even ‘healthy’ overweight people have a higher cardiac risk

Being overweight or obese is linked to coronary heart disease and heart attacks even when a person has healthy blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why Scottish babies might start sleeping in cardboard boxes

It is hoped that the cardboard boxes will help reduce cot deaths in Scotland. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Even ‘healthy’ overweight people have a higher cardiac risk

Being overweight or obese is linked to coronary heart disease and heart attacks even when a person has healthy blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Even ‘healthy’ overweight people have a higher cardiac risk

Being overweight or obese is linked to coronary heart disease and heart attacks even when a person has healthy blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Even ‘healthy’ overweight people have a higher cardiac risk

Being overweight or obese is linked to coronary heart disease and heart attacks even when a person has healthy blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Even ‘healthy’ overweight people have a higher cardiac risk

Being overweight or obese is linked to coronary heart disease and heart attacks even when a person has healthy blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Childhood exercise may protect against memory loss in old age

Rats that run during their youth are better able to remember new things when they are older - a finding that suggests exercise may help prevent dementia via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Monday, 14 August 2017

Childhood exercise may protect against memory loss in old age

Rats that run during their youth are better able to remember new things when they are older - a finding that suggests exercise may help prevent dementia via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Childhood exercise may protect against memory loss in old age

Rats that run during their youth are better able to remember new things when they are older - a finding that suggests exercise may help prevent dementia via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Childhood exercise may protect against memory loss in old age

Rats that run during their youth are better able to remember new things when they are older - a finding that suggests exercise may help prevent dementia via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Childhood exercise may protect against memory loss in old age

Rats that run during their youth are better able to remember new things when they are older - a finding that suggests exercise may help prevent dementia via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death

People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Multitasking: is it Overrated?

The ability to multitask is usually viewed positively. But does it help in improving productivity? New research indicates that this is highly unlikely.

For years we have been hearing and being allured by the term multitasking, with many of us unwittingly believing that it is something supernatural and too good to neglect, and we ought to develop it in ourselves to succeed. But the question arises, is it as good as it sounds? What does the new research say? Is it possible for a person to concentrate and remain productive on several tasks at once?

Going through research articles can be perplexing for most of us, but most of the research seems to favor doing one task at a time. There are several downsides to multitasking, often resulting in decreased overall productivity and quality of work. A person who tries to finish one job at a time seems to do more at the end of the day. Multitasking could be valuable only to a certain extent if you are doing some simple tasks, but after a certain threshold productivity decreases and quality of work suffers. Multitasking often fails to improve productivity.

Ultimately, it depends on the kind of tasks you are doing. If a person is doing lots of jobs, that are simple and the person performing them is adept at them, then maybe yes, in some cases multitasking may be good, but mostly this is not the case. Some people are inherently inferior to others in multitasking. One thing that most scientific research demonstrates is that multitasking results in significant loss of accuracy. The more you multitask, the more errors you are bound to make, thereby leading to reduced overall productivity. Considering that in some cases performance errors can even be catastrophic, improved performance with most multitasking is a mere illusion that comes at the price of poor results and higher error rate.

Multitasking leads to mental overloading

When people are given various tasks, they need some time to switch to another function. This results in the loss of both time and productivity. This switching time is directly related to the complexity of the task. If the task is being switched to is complicated and less familiar, one needs more time then when attending to more familiar task. Thus multitasking can result in mental overloading in reconfiguring mental settings as one switches between tasks. Also one has to memorize more information while switching between the various functions, like the progress status of the previous task. Research shows that these short mental blocks between the switching can bring down productivity by as much as forty percent. Scheduling tasks can be more efficient in increasing productivity as compared with multitasking.

What about gender differences?

Women may be better at juggling between several tasks, but this is true only when the tasks are simple in nature, the kind of tasks achieved on a daily basis, that do not require much mental processing. Examples include cleaning the house and talking on the phone. But when multitasking involves more complex tasks, this gender difference becomes irrelevant. Therefore,  talking on the phone while driving is equally dangerous for both sexes. In fact, one study demonstrated that women dislike multitasking as much as the men do. Given a choice, women don’t seem to switch between several tasks more often than men. When multitasking, both genders perform equally poorly. Whether multitasking is done by free will or it has been forced due to job constraints does not seem to have any effect on productivity.

Who is multitasking and why?

One study focused on finding personality differences between self-proclaimed multitaskers and non-multitaskers. The study tried to find out why some people opt to multitask while other may avoid, and if the multitaskers are actually any good at multitasking. Results of the research were quite astonishing.

Most of the people who multitask are not necessarily good at it. In fact, the results pointed to the opposite: people who are good at multitasking usually avoid doing it. Generally, those who are impulsive sensation seekers tend to multitask. By multitasking, some of these people seem to gain pleasure. Another reason why certain people multitask is due to overbloated self-assessment. Individuals who more regularly multitask often overrate their capabilities and fail to understand that they are not better than others in multitasking.

Multitaskers make mistakes more often, and they seem to be less self-critical about their abilities, and they have lowered understanding of their errors and losses. Further, multitaskers are often people with attention deficits who have difficulty focusing on a single given task.

What we know so far about multitasking

  • Multitasking decreases productivity in most cases, by as much as forty percent.
  • Multitasking results in much higher error rates, which reduces productivity and can be harmful in some cases.
  • There are no proven gender differences in efficient multitasking.
  • Multitasking is often related to certain personality traits like being impulsive and sensation seeking.
  • Multitaskers are not typically the people who are good at it.
  • Multitaskers often lack the ability to concentrate properly on a given task.
  • Effectiveness of multitasking depends on the complexity of the job, with multiple complex jobs being harder to do at the same time than multiple easy jobs.
  • Scheduling the various tasks can increase productivity relative to multitasking.

Thus,  the existing research studies seem to favor doing tasks sequentially or one by one, rather than multitasking. Multitasking increases the risk of making mistakes, and this rule applies equally to both genders. Therefore, understanding the downsides of multitasking not only improves productivity, but might also save us from catastrophic errors.

References

Adler, R.F., Benbunan-Fich, R., 2012. Juggling on a high wire: Multitasking effects on performance. Int. J. Hum.-Comput. Stud. 70, 156–168. doi: 10.1016/j.ijhcs.2011.10.003.

Buser, T., Peter, N., 2012. Multitasking. Exp. Econ. 15, 641–655. doi: 10.1007/s10683-012-9318-8.

Kc, D.S., 2013. Does Multitasking Improve Performance? Evidence from the Emergency Department. Manuf. Serv. Oper. Manag. 16, 168–183. doi: 10.1287/msom.2013.0464.

Multitasking: Switching costs [WWW Document], n.d. . http://www.apa.org. URL http://www.apa.org/research/action/multitask.aspx (accessed 7.22.17).

Sanbonmatsu, D.M., Strayer, D.L., Medeiros-Ward, N., Watson, J.M., 2013. Who Multi-Tasks and Why? Multi-Tasking Ability, Perceived Multi-Tasking Ability, Impulsivity, and Sensation Seeking. PLOS ONE 8, e54402. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0054402.

Image via SerenaWong/Pixabay.

via Brain Blogger Read More Here..

NHS cyber-defender Marcus Hutchins pleads not guilty in US

Marcus Hutchins was arrested on 2 August on a trip to cyber-security conferences in Las Vegas. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Activated charcoal drug can protect microbiome from antibiotics

A special formulation of activated charcoal can soak up excess antibiotics, protecting beneficial gut bacteria and potentially preventing diarrhoea via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Chemical controllers: How hormones influence your body and mind

Does testosterone make men bald? Is there a love hormone? Do pregnancy hormones turn your brain to mush? New Scientist sifts the facts from the fiction via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Anger and hatred can make us feel happy, says study

People have higher life satisfaction if they feel emotions they desire - even if they are unpleasant. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Cholera count reaches 500 000 in Yemen

The total number of suspected cholera cases in Yemen this year hit the half a million mark on Sunday, and nearly 2000 people have died since the outbreak began to spread rapidly at the end of April.

The overall caseload nationwide has declined since early July, particularly in the worst affected areas. But suspected cases of the deadly waterborne disease continue to rage across the country, infecting an estimated 5000 people per day. via WHO news Read More Here..

Chemical controllers: How hormones influence your body and mind

Does testosterone make men bald? Is there a love hormone? Do pregnancy hormones turn your brain to mush? New Scientist sifts the facts from the fiction via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Smart cameras spot when hospital staff don’t wash their hands

One in 20 people admitted to hospital pick up an infection while they’re there, but cameras tracking people’s movements could spot who’s spreading diseases via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Yemen cholera epidemic: Cases exceed 500,000 in four months

The overall caseload has declined since early July, but 5,000 people a day are still being infected. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Scottish ministers urged to lead fight against 'period poverty'

A Labour MSP says access to sanitary products should be a basic right for anyone who needs them. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Eggs containing fipronil found in 15 EU countries and Hong Kong

Fifteen EU countries as well as Hong Kong and Switzerland are said to have received tainted eggs. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Type 2 diabetes rise in children 'disturbing'

More than 600 children and teenagers are being treated for the condition in England and Wales, experts warn. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Breast cancer helpline founder paid herself £31k

Wendy Watson MBE has resigned as a trustee of National Hereditary Breast Cancer Helpline. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

World's oldest man, Auschwitz survivor Yisrael Kristal dies

Polish-born Yisrael Kristal survived two World Wars and Nazi camps before immigrating to Israel. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

'Raise your voices'

A blog on birth trauma is prompting women to share their own difficult experiences. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Teen's death at Chinese internet addiction camp sparks anger

The death has reignited criticism of internet addiction 'boot camps' known to employ harsh practices. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Sunday, 13 August 2017

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Saturday, 12 August 2017

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Brian Blessed 'bit off' umbilical cord delivering baby

Actor, director and Grampy Rabbit in Peppa Pig, Brian Blessed reveals Four Things You Don't Know About Me via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hard enough already

Flying with a wheelchair is hard enough - it's even harder when it's broken in transit. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Friday, 11 August 2017

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Why UK midwives are back-pedalling on natural childbirth

For decades, women have been encouraged to give birth naturally – that means avoiding all medicines and interventions. Now the Royal College of Midwives is changing its position via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Trump says he’ll declare US opioid epidemic a national emergency

President Trump plans to declare the opioid crisis an emergency after all, a move that should free up funds. But how much, and how they’ll be used, is unclear via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Trump says he’ll declare US opioid epidemic a national emergency

President Trump plans to declare the opioid crisis an emergency after all, a move that should free up funds. But how much, and how they’ll be used, is unclear via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Cold comfort: How chilling the lungs could beat heart attacks

If you can't restart a stopped heart within 5 minutes, brain damage starts. But using the lungs as a heat exchanger to chill the blood may buy us more time via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

CRISPR makes piglets that may be better organ donors for humans

Organ transplants from pigs are a step closer, after the birth of piglets that have had the harmful viruses in their DNA inactivated using gene editing via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

CRISPR makes piglets that may be better organ donors for humans

Organ transplants from pigs are a step closer, after the birth of piglets that have had the harmful viruses in their DNA inactivated using gene editing via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

CRISPR makes piglets that may be better organ donors for humans

Organ transplants from pigs are a step closer, after the birth of piglets that have had the harmful viruses in their DNA inactivated using gene editing via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

CRISPR makes piglets that may be better organ donors for humans

Organ transplants from pigs are a step closer, after the birth of piglets that have had the harmful viruses in their DNA inactivated using gene editing via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

CRISPR makes piglets that may be better organ donors for humans

Organ transplants from pigs are a step closer, after the birth of piglets that have had the harmful viruses in their DNA inactivated using gene editing via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

CRISPR makes piglets that may be better organ donors for humans

Organ transplants from pigs are a step closer, after the birth of piglets that have had the harmful viruses in their DNA inactivated using gene editing via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

CRISPR makes piglets that may be better organ donors for humans

Organ transplants from pigs are a step closer, after the birth of piglets that have had the harmful viruses in their DNA inactivated using gene editing via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

CRISPR makes piglets that may be better organ donors for humans

Organ transplants from pigs are a step closer, after the birth of piglets that have had the harmful viruses in their DNA inactivated using gene editing via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

GM pigs take step to being organ donors

Pigs have been freed of viruses that stop them being viable organ donors. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

CRISPR makes piglets that may be better organ donors for humans

Organ transplants from pigs are a step closer, after the birth of piglets that have had the harmful viruses in their DNA inactivated using gene editing via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Thursday, 10 August 2017

Trump declares US opioid pain drugs national emergency

The painkillers are now claiming four times as many lives in the US as 20 years ago. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Tainted eggs in Denmark: 20 tonnes sold

Twenty tonnes of insecticide-tainted eggs were sold in Denmark, its food safety authority says. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Side effects kill thousands but our data on them is flawed

As many as 40,000 people in the US die from drug side effects a year. The FDA’s database helps researchers understand why – but it has many problems via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

First implants derived from stem cells to ‘cure’ type 1 diabetes

Two people have been given implants of cells derived from embryonic stem cells that may be able to release insulin when needed to manage blood sugar levels via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Vitamin B3 may prevent miscarriages and birth defects, study suggests

Researchers from the Victor Chang Institute in Sydney call the news "a double breakthrough". via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

First implants derived from stem cells to ‘cure’ type 1 diabetes

Two people have been given implants of cells derived from embryonic stem cells that may be able to release insulin when needed to manage blood sugar levels via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Eggs scandal: 700,000 sent to UK but risk is 'unlikely'

UK supermarkets have withdrawn several products which contain eggs, including sandwiches and salads. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

This is why the first CRISPR baby won’t be born in the US

Hopes are high that gene editing embryos can ease inherited disease. The first such babies are likely within five years, but not in the US, says Jim Kozubek via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

From statistics to surgery to psychology: Our favourite reads

A visit to the bookstore turns up a trove of smart scientific (and not-so-scientific) thinking via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

This is why the first CRISPR baby won’t be born in the US

Hopes are high that gene editing embryos can ease inherited disease. The first such babies are likely within five years, but not in the US, says Jim Kozubek via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

From statistics to surgery to psychology: Our favourite reads

A visit to the bookstore turns up a trove of smart scientific (and not-so-scientific) thinking via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Yoga May Boost Aging Brains

Changes seen in areas involved with attention and memory, but it's not yet clear if yoga is the cause

HealthDay news image

Source: HealthDay via Exercise and Physical Fitness New Links: MedlinePlus RSS Feed Read More Here..

This is why the first CRISPR baby won’t be born in the US

Hopes are high that gene editing embryos can ease inherited disease. The first such babies are likely within five years, but not in the US, says Jim Kozubek via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

This is why the first CRISPR baby won’t be born in the US

Hopes are high that gene editing embryos can ease inherited disease. The first such babies are likely within five years, but not in the US, says Jim Kozubek via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

From statistics to surgery to psychology: Our favourite reads

A visit to the bookstore turns up a trove of smart scientific (and not-so-scientific) thinking via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

This is why the first CRISPR baby won’t be born in the US

Hopes are high that gene editing embryos can ease inherited disease. The first such babies are likely within five years, but not in the US, says Jim Kozubek via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

From statistics to surgery to psychology: Our favourite reads

A visit to the bookstore turns up a trove of smart scientific (and not-so-scientific) thinking via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

This is why the first CRISPR baby won’t be born in the US

Hopes are high that gene editing embryos can ease inherited disease. The first such babies are likely within five years, but not in the US, says Jim Kozubek via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

From statistics to surgery to psychology: Our favourite reads

A visit to the bookstore turns up a trove of smart scientific (and not-so-scientific) thinking via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

This is why the first CRISPR baby won’t be born in the US

Hopes are high that gene editing embryos can ease inherited disease. The first such babies are likely within five years, but not in the US, says Jim Kozubek via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

From statistics to surgery to psychology: Our favourite reads

A visit to the bookstore turns up a trove of smart scientific (and not-so-scientific) thinking via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

From statistics to surgery to psychology: Our favourite reads

A visit to the bookstore turns up a trove of smart scientific (and not-so-scientific) thinking via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

From statistics to surgery to psychology: Our favourite reads

A visit to the bookstore turns up a trove of smart scientific (and not-so-scientific) thinking via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

From statistics to surgery to psychology: Our favourite reads

A visit to the bookstore turns up a trove of smart scientific (and not-so-scientific) thinking via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Type 1 diabetes may be halted by experimental immunotherapy

For the first time, an immunotherapy approach for treating type 1 diabetes has been found to be safe, and it seems to stop the condition from getting worse via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Type 1 diabetes may be halted by experimental immunotherapy

For the first time, an immunotherapy approach for treating type 1 diabetes has been found to be safe, and it seems to stop the condition from getting worse via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Type 1 diabetes may be halted by experimental immunotherapy

For the first time, an immunotherapy approach for treating type 1 diabetes has been found to be safe, and it seems to stop the condition from getting worse via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Type 1 diabetes may be halted by experimental immunotherapy

For the first time, an immunotherapy approach for treating type 1 diabetes has been found to be safe, and it seems to stop the condition from getting worse via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Type 1 diabetes may be halted by experimental immunotherapy

For the first time, an immunotherapy approach for treating type 1 diabetes has been found to be safe, and it seems to stop the condition from getting worse via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Wednesday, 9 August 2017

Pioneering type 1 diabetes therapy safe

One day, the immunotherapy could free patients from daily insulin injections. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Hot yoga classes reduce emotional eating and negative thoughts

There’s growing evidence that yoga can help with symptoms of depression, suggesting the practice might complement talking therapies and antidepressants via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

England’s dire north-south health gap is a scandal that must end

The north-south divide in England needs fixing or the country risks more despair, premature death and political earthquakes, says James Bloodworth via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Chemical controllers: How hormones influence your body and mind

Does testosterone make men bald? Is there a love hormone? Do pregnancy hormones turn your brain to mush? New Scientist sifts the facts from the fiction via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Chemical controllers: How hormones influence your body and mind

Does testosterone make men bald? Is there a love hormone? Do pregnancy hormones turn your brain to mush? New Scientist sifts the facts from the fiction via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Third of men say work a factor in mental health problems

Andrew Ormerod explains how his unsustainable workload led to mental health problems. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Chemical controllers: How hormones influence your body and mind

Does testosterone make men bald? Is there a love hormone? Do pregnancy hormones turn your brain to mush? New Scientist sifts the facts from the fiction via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..