Sunday, 30 April 2017

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Goggles give Charlie new sight

Charlie, now eight, started losing his sight aged four, and has only been able to see close up until now. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Motherhood in the time of Zika

Katie Falkenberg's photo feature on mothers caring for children damaged by the Zika virus in Brazil was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2017. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Saturday, 29 April 2017

Friday, 28 April 2017

Addicted to love? Craving comes in two forms, and both can hurt

The idea that people can be addicted to love is contentious, but a review of 64 studies found evidence for two different but harmful forms of this condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Addicted to love? Craving comes in two forms, and both can hurt

The idea that people can be addicted to love is contentious, but a review of 64 studies found evidence for two different but harmful forms of this condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Addicted to love? Craving comes in two forms, and both can hurt

The idea that people can be addicted to love is contentious, but a review of 64 studies found evidence for two different but harmful forms of this condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Addicted to love? Craving comes in two forms, and both can hurt

The idea that people can be addicted to love is contentious, but a review of 64 studies found evidence for two different but harmful forms of this condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Addicted to love? Craving comes in two forms, and both can hurt

The idea that people can be addicted to love is contentious, but a review of 64 studies found evidence for two different but harmful forms of this condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

The Only Recipe You Need to Make a Perfect Skinny Margarita

The Only Recipe You Need to Make a Perfect Skinny Margarita Blog Post

There's a lot to love about a classic margarita. Hey, it's classic for a reason, right? But juicy grapefruit, mango or blood orange margaritas sound pretty good too. This margarita formula allows you to mix up a pitcher with whatever fruit flavor you're in the mood for. We use just a touch of simple syrup and add fresh fruit juice for sweetness, flavor and color. Plus, these margaritas taste so good no one will miss the cloying sweetness of a restaurant-style or premade-mix margarita—which can have 10 to 15 teaspoons of added sugar.

via EatingWell Blogs - All Blog Posts More READ

Addicted to love? Craving comes in two forms, and both can hurt

The idea that people can be addicted to love is contentious, but a review of 64 studies found evidence for two different but harmful forms of this condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Addicted to love? Craving comes in two forms, and both can hurt

The idea that people can be addicted to love is contentious, but a review of 64 studies found evidence for two different but harmful forms of this condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Addicted to love? Craving comes in two forms, and both can hurt

The idea that people can be addicted to love is contentious, but a review of 64 studies found evidence for two different but harmful forms of this condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Addicted to love? Craving comes in two forms, and both can hurt

The idea that people can be addicted to love is contentious, but a review of 64 studies found evidence for two different but harmful forms of this condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

DIY gun control: The people taking matters into their own hands

With the Trump administration stripping away firearms legislation, can citizen scientists and technologists rein in the excesses of US gun culture? via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Debbie Douglas on her breast surgeon Ian Paterson

Debbie Douglas speaks about surgeon Ian Paterson, who's guilty of intentionally wounding patients. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

No Excuses: Exercise Can Overcome the 'Obesity Gene'

Physical activity appears to lower effects of key DNA linked to weight gain, study finds

HealthDay news image

Source: HealthDay via Exercise and Physical Fitness New Links: MedlinePlus RSS Feed Read More Here..

Defying dementia: Live better for longer after a diagnosis

Simple things can slow cognitive decline and keep you – or your loved one – sharper for longer via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Creative people physically see and process the world differently

Those who display a high degree of the openness personality trait may be more creative because of the way they process visual information via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Creative people physically see and process the world differently

Those who display a high degree of the openness personality trait may be more creative because of the way they process visual information via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Creative people physically see and process the world differently

Those who display a high degree of the openness personality trait may be more creative because of the way they process visual information via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Poorna Bell on the addiction and suicide of her husband

Poorna Bell explains how her husband took his own life after a secret battle with heroin addiction via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

GPs fear sexual health will become ‘Cinderella service of NHS’

Bureaucratic, financial and training barriers are in danger of reversing major improvements

Related items from OnMedica

4% fewer patients accessed sexual health services last year
Access to UK sexual health clinics has worsened over past few years
Sexual health ‘savings’ are a false economy
Fragmented sexual health system is failing users
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

MPs say NHS must be at the heart of Brexit talks

Commons Health Committee calls for guarantees to ensure continuity for staff and patients

Related items from OnMedica

Brexit white paper unveiled: what next for the NHS?
Grant EU doctors permanent residence now, BMA urges government
Brexit business has become real – the NHS must keep watch
Brexit: what’s next for UK science and patients?
NHS should be ‘at the forefront’ of general election debate, RCGP says
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Cancer Drug Fund didn’t deliver value ‘to patients or society’

A fund that spent more than £1 billion on expensive new cancer drugs in England had little clinical benefit, a study of 29 medicines has concluded via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?

Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Cancer Drugs Fund ‘wasteful and harmful’

Damning analysis found only one in five treatments was beneficial

Related items from OnMedica

Expensive cancer drugs have little impact on survival
UK patients losing out in access to cancer drugs
Cancer drug access in England is a ‘debacle’
MPs slam government for its poor management of Cancer Drugs Fund
75% of reappraised CDF drugs approved for NHS
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Cancer Drug Fund didn’t deliver value ‘to patients or society’

A fund that spent more than £1 billion on expensive new cancer drugs in England had little clinical benefit, a study of 29 medicines has concluded via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?

Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

The secret swaps to being healthier and more efficient

Article Apr 28, 2017
via Healthy Eating Read More..

Cancer Drug Fund didn’t deliver value ‘to patients or society’

A fund that spent more than £1 billion on expensive new cancer drugs in England had little clinical benefit, a study of 29 medicines has concluded via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?

Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Too many terminally ill patients still dying in hospital

Charity urges people to be more open in talking about death and dying

Related items from OnMedica

Palliative care
Plea for greater GP role in end-of-life care
Palliative/end-of-life care provision a ‘postcode lottery’ in England
Care of the dying compromised by NHS pressures
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Cancer Drug Fund didn’t deliver value ‘to patients or society’

A fund that spent more than £1 billion on expensive new cancer drugs in England had little clinical benefit, a study of 29 medicines has concluded via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?

Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hopes for early warning glaucoma detector

New test could reveal signs of change a decade before damage is done

Related items from OnMedica

Eye problems
Eye problems: the eyelids
Eye test may reveal signs of dementia
Infective conjunctivitis cases ‘clogging up’ GP appointments system
STPs can help CCGs deliver eye care at scale
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Cancer Drug Fund didn’t deliver value ‘to patients or society’

A fund that spent more than £1 billion on expensive new cancer drugs in England had little clinical benefit, a study of 29 medicines has concluded via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Cancer Drug Fund didn’t deliver value ‘to patients or society’

A fund that spent more than £1 billion on expensive new cancer drugs in England had little clinical benefit, a study of 29 medicines has concluded via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?

Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Cancer Drug Fund didn’t deliver value ‘to patients or society’

A fund that spent more than £1 billion on expensive new cancer drugs in England had little clinical benefit, a study of 29 medicines has concluded via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?

Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Cancer Drug Fund didn’t deliver value ‘to patients or society’

A fund that spent more than £1 billion on expensive new cancer drugs in England had little clinical benefit, a study of 29 medicines has concluded via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?

Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Cancer Drug Fund didn’t deliver value ‘to patients or society’

A fund that spent more than £1 billion on expensive new cancer drugs in England had little clinical benefit, a study of 29 medicines has concluded via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?

Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Cancer Drug Fund didn’t deliver value ‘to patients or society’

A fund that spent more than £1 billion on expensive new cancer drugs in England had little clinical benefit, a study of 29 medicines has concluded via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?

Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Cancer Drug Fund didn’t deliver value ‘to patients or society’

A fund that spent more than £1 billion on expensive new cancer drugs in England had little clinical benefit, a study of 29 medicines has concluded via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Cancer Drug Fund didn’t deliver value ‘to patients or society’

A fund that spent more than £1 billion on expensive new cancer drugs in England had little clinical benefit, a study of 29 medicines has concluded via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Cancer Drug Fund didn’t deliver value ‘to patients or society’

A fund that spent more than £1 billion on expensive new cancer drugs in England had little clinical benefit, a study of 29 medicines has concluded via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?

Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Cancer Drug Fund didn’t deliver value ‘to patients or society’

A fund that spent more than £1 billion on expensive new cancer drugs in England had little clinical benefit, a study of 29 medicines has concluded via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Cancer Drug Fund didn’t deliver value ‘to patients or society’

A fund that spent more than £1 billion on expensive new cancer drugs in England had little clinical benefit, a study of 29 medicines has concluded via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?

Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Cancer Drug Fund didn’t deliver value ‘to patients or society’

A fund that spent more than £1 billion on expensive new cancer drugs in England had little clinical benefit, a study of 29 medicines has concluded via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?

Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Cancer Drug Fund didn’t deliver value ‘to patients or society’

A fund that spent more than £1 billion on expensive new cancer drugs in England had little clinical benefit, a study of 29 medicines has concluded via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?

Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Cancer Drug Fund didn’t deliver value ‘to patients or society’

A fund that spent more than £1 billion on expensive new cancer drugs in England had little clinical benefit, a study of 29 medicines has concluded via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?

Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?

Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?

Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Thursday, 27 April 2017

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?

Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Thousands of lives at risk as Gaza public hospitals face fuel and electricity crisis

Increasing power cuts and shortages of fuel are creating an impending crisis for Gaza’s 14 public hospitals, threatening the closure of essential health services which would leave thousands of people without access to life-saving health care. via WHO news Read More Here..

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?

Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?

Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

3 Mother's Day Breakfast-in-Bed Menus to Make Mom Feel Like a Queen

3 Mother's Day Breakfast-in-Bed Menus to Make Mom Feel Like a Queen Blog Post

I'm a working mother of two kids under 5. What do I want for Mother's Day? Breakfast in bed. I want to sleep in till 7 (gasp!). I want my hubby to bring me a cup of coffee and that stack of magazines I've been meaning to read for months years. And I want my family to make me breakfast while I sit lazily in the comfort of that lovely piece of furniture that doesn't see enough of me: bed.

via EatingWell Blogs - All Blog Posts More READ

Addicted to love? Craving comes in two forms, and both can hurt

The idea that people can be addicted to love is contentious, but a review of 64 studies found evidence for two different but harmful forms of this condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Addicted to love? Craving comes in two forms, and both can hurt

The idea that people can be addicted to love is contentious, but a review of 64 studies found evidence for two different but harmful forms of this condition via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Your inner hoarder: Why letting go is so hard to do

We all know that decluttering is cathartic, so why are our lives still full of junk? The paradoxical world of hoarding disorder has some answers via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Psychedelic drugs push the brain to a state never seen before

Brain measurements have revealed that LSD, ketamine and psilocybin cause patterns of brain activity that are far more diverse than normal consciousness via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Defying dementia: How to keep your brain fighting fit

The number of people with dementia in the US, UK and other wealthy nations has gone down in recent years – a healthy lifestyle can make a difference via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Defying dementia: How to keep your brain fighting fit

The number of people with dementia in the US, UK and other wealthy nations has gone down in recent years – a healthy lifestyle can make a difference via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Unstable chromosomes in lung tumours linked to heightened relapse risk

Finding could help predict disease return before standard tests can, say researchers

Related items from OnMedica

Survival rates rise for lung cancer surgery
UK lung cancer survival rates are improving
Major boost for lung cancer diagnosis
Blood test could help predict response to lung cancer treatment
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Better Care Fund ‘ruse’ to hide lack of funds for adult social care

And it has failed to achieve any of its stated objectives, says highly critical report

Related items from OnMedica

Major reform of social care funding and provision needed
Set up independent ‘Office for Health and Care Scrutiny,’ Lords demand
Integrated health and social care workforces is the future
Better Care Fund ‘built on flawed logic’
NHS to have protected slice of the joint health/social care fund
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Government still clueless on GP extended access issues, say MPs

No understanding of current provision or how to maximise existing resources

Related items from OnMedica

It ‘beggars belief’ that seven-day NHS plans are uncosted, say MPs
Poor GP access ‘not chief reason for A&E winter pressures’
Pressure increases on CCGs to meet GP access targets
To improve GP access, we all need to step out of the trenches
The incredible invisible bed crisis
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Paediatrician shortfall jeopardising child health services

Workforce data reveal widespread vacancy rates for senior doctors and trainees

Related items from OnMedica

Children’s services at ‘breaking point’ survey reveals
Three quarters of CCGs miss child mental health target
New child care standards could cut hospital admissions
Neonatal staff shortage warning
Staff survey results ‘alarming’, say health leaders
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Plain cigarette packs may be helping to drive down smoking prevalence

Cochrane review finds that emerging evidence seems to back the measure

Related items from OnMedica

Smoking cessation
Cancer charity calls for a ‘tobacco levy’ to save quit services
Hospitals 'must' become tobacco-free
Report claims plain packaging has cut smoking rates
Global tobacco treaty cuts smoking rates by 2.5%
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Cheap and accessible drug tackles death in childbirth

New research shows promising results for cutting the risk of women bleeding to death in childbirth. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Postpartum haemorrhage: Cheap lifesaver 'cuts deaths by a third'

A drug to stop bleeding after labour could cut deaths by a third, research suggests. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Wednesday, 26 April 2017

'Exciting' blood test spots cancer a year early

The discovery allows doctors to detect returning tumours earlier and increases chances of a cure. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Anne-Marie Slaughter: A year's maternity leave is too long for mothers

Former Hillary Clinton advisor Anne-Marie Slaughter clarifies why she thinks a year of maternity leave is too long for working mothers. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

American woman gives birth during family trip to a zoo in Omaha, Nebraska

Kymica Hubbard was on a family day out at a zoo in Omaha, Nebraska, when she went into early labour. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Pollution nanoparticles may enter your blood and cause disease

A study of airborne nanoparticles – which are nearly impossible to measure in our air - may explain why pollution is linked to heart attacks and strokes via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Vital that parties tackle NHS funding shortfall

Politicians must show how they will address £30bn funding gap in the NHS, says BMA

Related items from OnMedica

GP politician makes direct plea to Chancellor on NHS funding
Doctors make plea to PM over NHS funding
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Defying dementia: It is not inevitable

Growing older doesn't necessarily mean you'll get dementia. Cases are rising as more of us live longer, but the reasons are debated and you can fight back via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Air pollution: 'Heart disease link found'

Extremely small particles of air pollution have the potential to end up in the body, a study suggests. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Put patients before Brexit, College tells politicians

RCGP urges all parties to put general practice and patient care at the centre of manifestos

Related items from OnMedica

Unmanageable GP workload threatens safety of patient care, warns GP leader
GP Forward View has had ‘patchy’ first year
Brexit: what’s next for UK science and patients?
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Health system complexities holding back HIV progress

Services need to focus on quality of life in older people, not just on viral suppression

Related items from OnMedica

Preventing HIV
GPs should offer HIV tests in routine appointments
UK HIV diagnosis rates twice as high as western Europe
HIV infection may make patients vulnerable to diabetes
Scotland first country in UK to fund PrEP through NHS
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Long delay after FIT linked to higher risk of cancer

Increased risk of colorectal cancer when colonoscopy delayed after positive screening test

Related items from OnMedica

Developing and using a tool to improve outcomes in colorectal cancer
Early stage bowel cancer more likely to be picked up by screening
Fifth of emergency bowel cancer cases had red flag symptoms
Nearly a third of hospitals failing bowel cancer patients
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Real food and brisk daily walk best for heart health

Common belief that saturated fats clog arteries and cause CHD ‘plain wrong’, say experts

Related items from OnMedica

Advice to eat more fat, sparks major health row
Diet for lowering blood pressure also reduces risk of kidney disease
Mediterranean diet reduces brain shrinkage in elderly
May be time for Britons to switch to Mediterranean diet, study suggests
Nutrition more important than calories, say experts
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Tuesday, 25 April 2017

Artificial womb helps premature lamb fetuses grow for 4 weeks

A fluid-filled plastic bag can help extremely premature lambs to develop and grow – and will be used to support premature babies in three years’ time via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

'500kg' Egyptian woman's sister accuses Indian doctors of lying

The sister of an Egyptian woman who went to India for weight loss surgery lashes out at her doctors. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Mid-Life Exercise Could Jog Your Memory

Combination of aerobic, resistance training best for boosting brain health, study finds

HealthDay news image

Source: HealthDay via Exercise and Physical Fitness New Links: MedlinePlus RSS Feed Read More Here..

Exercise Benefits Aging Hearts, Even Those of The Obese

Physical activity helps ward off heart damage in middle age and beyond, study finds

HealthDay news image

Source: HealthDay via Exercise and Physical Fitness New Links: MedlinePlus RSS Feed Read More Here..

Premature lambs kept alive in 'plastic bag' womb

Scientists were able to keep premature lambs alive for a month using an artificial "plastic bag" womb. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Doctors concerned over talking to DVLA about patients

New GMC guidance on doctors disclosing information to DVLA comes into effect today

Related items from OnMedica

Driving errors double due to mild dehydration
Lower drink-drive limit, says police
GPs tell DVLA about patients who should not be driving
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

GP Forward View has had ‘patchy’ first year

BMA has grave workforce concerns, and demands urgent delivery of promised funding

Related items from OnMedica

GP leader urges caution over ‘super-hub’ general practice
Things to look forward to
GP leaders warn against ‘imposing’ services
The incredible invisible bed crisis
BMA calls for maximum number of patients per GP
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

WHO Director-General’s statement to high-level pledging event for the humanitarian crisis in Yemen

Nearly 19 million people in Yemen are in desperate need of assistance. This is a country that has been battered by conflict for more than two years. This is a country that, before the conflict intensified, was already extremely vulnerable following years of poverty, political unrest, and weak rule of law.

Since the conflict intensified, some 325 attacks have been verified on health facilities, schools, markets, roads, and other infrastructure, added to the challenges and the population’s many causes of misery. via WHO news Read More Here..

Ted 2017: Frugal scientist offers malaria tools

A toy-inspired device for malaria detection that costs 20 cents is shown off at the Ted conference via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Third of emergency cancer presenters never saw GP

Emergency cancer diagnosis doesn’t signal missed GP diagnosis, but more help still needed

Related items from OnMedica

Variation in GP cancer referrals identified
GP cancer guidelines should be 'liberalised' for easier referrals
Labour to invest in GP cancer equipment in ‘every town’
Early diagnosis needed to improve ovarian cancer survival rates
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Medical marijuana may be a salve for the US opioid epidemic

In US states where medical marijuana has been legalised, people seem to be switching from other prescribed drugs to cannabis as a treatment for pain via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cells

Some people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Abused babies sicker and younger than those accidentally injured

Most babies severely injured by abuse present late and arrive by car at non-trauma hospital

Related items from OnMedica

New ambition to halve infant deaths by 2030 in England
Abused children unable to access mental health services
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Moderate exercise improves over-50s’ brain health

Tell over-50s to take 45-60 min aerobic and resistance exercise to improve cognition

Related items from OnMedica

Aerobic exercise benefits moderate to severe asthma
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Inside a neonatal intensive care unit

What does it take to care for the sickest premature babies? 5 live takes a look inside the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Burnley General hospital. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Exercise 'keeps the mind sharp' in over-50s, study finds

The brain is fed with more oxygen and nutrients, boosting thinking and memory skills. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

The volunteers helping ambulances to get to Syria

The BBC meets volunteers in the biggest ever convoy to transport medical vehicles from the UK to Syria. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Google’s new project will gather health data from 10,000 people

Verily’s Project Baseline is set to study the genes, microbiomes and well-being of US volunteers, but it might not cover enough people to give useful results via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Google’s new project will gather health data from 10,000 people

Verily’s Project Baseline is set to study the genes, microbiomes and well-being of US volunteers, but it might not cover enough people to give useful results via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Google’s new project will gather health data from 10,000 people

Verily’s Project Baseline is set to study the genes, microbiomes and well-being of US volunteers, but it might not cover enough people to give useful results via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Google’s new project will gather health data from 10,000 people

Verily’s Project Baseline is set to study the genes, microbiomes and well-being of US volunteers, but it might not cover enough people to give useful results via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Google’s new project will gather health data from 10,000 people

Verily’s Project Baseline is set to study the genes, microbiomes and well-being of US volunteers, but it might not cover enough people to give useful results via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Google’s new project will gather health data from 10,000 people

Verily’s Project Baseline is set to study the genes, microbiomes and well-being of US volunteers, but it might not cover enough people to give useful results via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Google’s new project will gather health data from 10,000 people

Verily’s Project Baseline is set to study the genes, microbiomes and well-being of US volunteers, but it might not cover enough people to give useful results via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Google’s new project will gather health data from 10,000 people

Verily’s Project Baseline is set to study the genes, microbiomes and well-being of US volunteers, but it might not cover enough people to give useful results via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Google’s new project will gather health data from 10,000 people

Verily’s Project Baseline is set to study the genes, microbiomes and well-being of US volunteers, but it might not cover enough people to give useful results via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Google’s new project will gather health data from 10,000 people

Verily’s Project Baseline is set to study the genes, microbiomes and well-being of US volunteers, but it might not cover enough people to give useful results via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Google’s new project will gather health data from 10,000 people

Verily’s Project Baseline is set to study the genes, microbiomes and well-being of US volunteers, but it might not cover enough people to give useful results via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Monday, 24 April 2017

Google’s new project will gather health data from 10,000 people

Verily’s Project Baseline is set to study the genes, microbiomes and well-being of US volunteers, but it might not cover enough people to give useful results via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Google’s new project will gather health data from 10,000 people

Verily’s Project Baseline is set to study the genes, microbiomes and well-being of US volunteers, but it might not cover enough people to give useful results via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Google’s new project will gather health data from 10,000 people

Verily’s Project Baseline is set to study the genes, microbiomes and well-being of US volunteers, but it might not cover enough people to give useful results via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Google’s new project will gather health data from 10,000 people

Verily’s Project Baseline is set to study the genes, microbiomes and well-being of US volunteers, but it might not cover enough people to give useful results via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg on grief: It does get better

Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg speaks movingly about her grief after the sudden death of her husband. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Google’s new project will gather health data from 10,000 people

Verily’s Project Baseline is set to study the genes, microbiomes and well-being of US volunteers, but it might not cover enough people to give useful results via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Zika outbreak may have led to fewer births in Rio de Janeiro

Early figures suggest several thousand fewer babies were born in the Brazilian city than usual in the second half of 2016, but there could be several reasons why via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Targeting Alzheimer’s: New Unorthodox Approaches

Alzheimer’s disease affects an estimated 5 million individuals in the US and causes a devastating loss of cognitive function due to the buildup of beta-amyloid and tau proteins in the brain. Previous efforts to combat this disease have focused on developing drugs that target beta-amyloid, but such treatments have been unsuccessful in patients so far. Several exciting new approaches for treating Alzheimer’s are currently being tested in clinical trials in the US and Europe. These trials will assess the efficacy of an anti-viral drug that is normally used to treat herpes, and a new vaccine that generates antibodies against tau protein.

Alzheimer’s disease was first identified in 1906 and is the most common cause of dementia, responsible for an estimated 60–70 percent of dementia cases. Alzheimer’s predominantly affects the elderly, but approximately 5 percent of cases involve early-onset disease (prior to the age of 65). The predominant symptoms of Alzheimer’s are a loss of memory and other intellectual capacities, which must be severe enough to interfere with everyday functioning. Mood swings and behavioral difficulties are also predominant symptoms. As the disease progresses, motor functions can also be impacted, inhibiting the ability of patients to speak, swallow, and even walk. Affected individuals typically survive between 4–20 years beyond the time that their symptoms become noticeable to others, with an average survival time of 8 years.

Research into the causes of Alzheimer’s has revealed that two proteins, beta-amyloid and tau, play a key role in disrupting the neural processes that underlie memory and other cognitive abilities. Beta-amyloid normally acts to combat oxidative stress, regulate cholesterol transport, and fight off bacteria in the brain. In Alzheimer’s, however, beta-amyloid is overproduced. The excess protein forms clumps, or plaques, around neurons that can interfere with the transmission of nerve impulses. Tau is found in abundance in neurons and normally acts to stabilize cell proteins called microtubules in neuronal axons. In Alzheimer’s disease, defective forms of tau are produced, often containing large numbers of attached phosphate groups, termed hyperphosphorylated tau. Defective tau fails to stabilize microtubules, and instead binds together into insoluble aggregates or “tangles” of protein. The buildup of these neurofibrillary tangles inside of neurons, combined with amyloid plaques surrounding neurons, disrupts cell-to-cell communication in the brain.

Current therapies for Alzheimer’s include drugs that treat the symptoms of dementia by regulating neurotransmitter levels; however, none of these treatments directly addresses the cause of the disease. Research efforts have focused on finding a drug that can prevent the buildup of plaques by interfering with beta amyloid synthesis and aggregation. Unfortunately, despite promising preclinical data from animal studies, these drugs failed to produce results in humans or had devastating side effects. For example, one anti-beta-amyloid vaccine caused meningoencephalitis or inflammation of the brain tissue and surrounding membranes. This side effect may have resulted from the reaction of the vaccine with beta-amyloid normally present in the walls of blood vessels. Such serious side effects were cause for cessation of the trial, and researchers have subsequently turned their attention to other possible treatments.

A research team led by Hugo Lövheim from the Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation and the Unit of Geriatric Medicine at Umeå University in Sweden is piloting the first clinical study to address the effect of a herpes virus drug on Alzheimer’s disease. Lövheim’s group previously showed that infection with herpes virus was correlated with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease. People who tested positive for antibodies associated with the reactivated form of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 anti-IgM) had double the risk of developing Alzheimer’s. Thus, the researchers surmised that brain signaling pathways activated by the virus might trigger the disease, and conversely, that anti-viral drugs might reverse disease symptoms.

The VALZ-Pilot study is currently recruiting participants with Alzheimer’s to investigate the effects of Valaciclovir, sold by the brand name Valtrex, a drug typically prescribed to treat genital herpes, cold sores, and shingles. Thirty-six participants will receive four weeks of drug treatment. Markers in the spinal fluid will be examined to assess the effect of the drug on several Alzheimer’s disease parameters, including levels of tau protein. A subset of subjects will also undergo positive emission tomography (PET) brain imaging analysis. By using a tracer that accumulates in cells with active herpes infection, this methodology can potentially detect this infection in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients.

A second new approach for treating Alzheimer’s, spearheaded by Petr Novak and colleagues at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, is the generation of a vaccine that targets the tau protein. Previous vaccine treatments for Alzheimer’s, which have thus far proven unsuccessful, focused only on beta-amyloid. The new vaccine, AADvac1, will prompt the body to generate antibodies against tau. The production of anti-tau antibodies will hopefully direct the immune system to clear tau protein from inside brain cells, similar to the way it fights off viruses and bacteria.

Developing a tau vaccine wasn’t easy; tau is a protein also found in healthy brains, and thus the removal of “healthy tau” by a vaccine could have negative side effects. The researchers compared differences in the structure of the healthy and pathological tau proteins, and identified what they call the “Achilles heel” of the abnormal protein. They were then able to create a vaccine that recognizes this feature of the abnormal protein, yielding treatment specificity for the disease-causing tau.

So far the AADvac1 vaccine is in phase 1 of clinical trials, which involves administration of the drug to healthy volunteers to assess side effects, but does not address efficacy. No serious side effects have been observed thus far, and volunteers have experienced only minor reactions at the injection site, similar to other types of vaccines. The lack of side effects is a promising first step. Moreover, the trial has also demonstrated the effectiveness of the drug to elicit an immune response, which is a critical factor for its success. These promising preliminary data provide much-needed hope for Alzheimer’s patients and their families.

References

Hippius H, Neundörfer G. (2003) The discovery of Alzheimer’s disease. Dialogues Clin Neurosci. 5(1):101-8. PMID: 22034141.

Marciani D. (2016) A retrospective analysis of the Alzheimer’s disease vaccine progress – The critical need for new development strategies. J Neurochem. 137(5):687-700. doi: 10.1111/jnc.13608.

Novak P, RSchmidt R, Kontsekova E, Zilka N, Kovacech B, Skrabana R, Vince-Kazmerova Z, Katina S, Fialova L, Prcina M, Parrak V, Dal-Bianco P, Brunner M, Staffen W, Rainer M, Ondrus M, Ropele S, Smisek M, Sivak R, Winblad B, Novak M. (2016) Safety and immunogenicity of the tau vaccine AADvac1 in patients with Alzheimer’s disease: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 1 trial. The Lancet Neurology. S1474-4422(16)30331-3. doi: 10.1016/S1474-4422(16)30331-3.

Lövheim H, Gilthorpe J, Adolfsson R, Nilsson L, Elgh F. (2014) Reactivated herpes simplex infection increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimers Dement. 11(6):593-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2014.04.522.

Image via sasint / Pixabay.

via Brain Blogger Read More Here..

Zika outbreak may have led to fewer births in Rio de Janeiro

Early figures suggest several thousand fewer babies were born in the Brazilian city than usual in the second half of 2016, but there could be several reasons why via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Timing of Lunch, Recess May Determine What Kids Eat

Study found children who ate first consumed more vegetables, while those who played first wasted less food

HealthDay news image

Source: HealthDay via Exercise for Children New Links: MedlinePlus RSS Feed Read More Here..

Your true self: When the self breaks

That seamless sense of who you are can be disturbed by many things, including illness, injury or drugs, explain Anil Ananthaswamy and Graham Lawton via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

New test identifies antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Technique uses current hospital equipment

Related items from OnMedica

Use of antimicrobial sutures saves money
Point-of-care CRP tests could save NHS millions
Antibiotic research programme launched
Patient safety alert issued on antimicrobial resistance
Point-of-care diagnostics needed to curb antimicrobial resistance
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

New laws to tackle sexual abuse introduced in Scotland

Juries to better understand victims’ responses

Related items from OnMedica

Domestic violence linked to pregnancy termination
Sexual assault found to include young age and alcohol consumption
New support to help identify domestic abuse
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Prevent malaria - save lives: WHO push for prevention on World Malaria Day, 25th April

At an event on the eve of World Malaria Day in Nairobi, WHO called today for accelerated scale-up of efforts to prevent malaria and save lives. via WHO news Read More Here..

Three countries get first malaria vaccine

It should prevent four in 10 cases of the disease. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Brain Tumour Charity cautious about Italy mobile phone ruling

Charity urges caution after a ruling in Italy about mobile phone use and brain tumour growth. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

'The grief can damage your mental health'

Survivors say the pain of bereavement can easily push people into mental illness without proper support. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

'I've given up everything to care for mum'

Sue Jenkins says she has given up her life to care for her 88-year-old mother who has dementia. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Saturday, 22 April 2017

Should you worry about heavy phone use causing cancer?

An Italian court has ruled that heavy cellphone usage was to blame for a man’s tumour. But there is still no convincing evidence that phones raise cancer risk via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Should you worry about heavy phone use causing cancer?

An Italian court has ruled that heavy cellphone usage was to blame for a man’s tumour. But there is still no convincing evidence that phones raise cancer risk via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Should you worry about heavy phone use causing cancer?

An Italian court has ruled that heavy cellphone usage was to blame for a man’s tumour. But there is still no convincing evidence that phones raise cancer risk via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Should you worry about heavy phone use causing cancer?

An Italian court has ruled that heavy cellphone usage was to blame for a man’s tumour. But there is still no convincing evidence that phones raise cancer risk via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Should you worry about heavy phone use causing cancer?

An Italian court has ruled that heavy cellphone usage was to blame for a man’s tumour. But there is still no convincing evidence that phones raise cancer risk via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Should you worry about heavy phone use causing cancer?

An Italian court has ruled that heavy cellphone usage was to blame for a man’s tumour. But there is still no convincing evidence that phones raise cancer risk via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Should you worry about heavy phone use causing cancer?

An Italian court has ruled that heavy cellphone usage was to blame for a man’s tumour. But there is still no convincing evidence that phones raise cancer risk via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Should you worry about heavy phone use causing cancer?

An Italian court has ruled that heavy cellphone usage was to blame for a man’s tumour. But there is still no convincing evidence that phones raise cancer risk via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Should you worry about heavy phone use causing cancer?

An Italian court has ruled that heavy cellphone usage was to blame for a man’s tumour. But there is still no convincing evidence that phones raise cancer risk via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Should you worry about heavy phone use causing cancer?

An Italian court has ruled that heavy cellphone usage was to blame for a man’s tumour. But there is still no convincing evidence that phones raise cancer risk via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Should you worry about heavy phone use causing cancer?

An Italian court has ruled that heavy cellphone usage was to blame for a man’s tumour. But there is still no convincing evidence that phones raise cancer risk via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Should you worry about heavy phone use causing cancer?

An Italian court has ruled that heavy cellphone usage was to blame for a man’s tumour. But there is still no convincing evidence that phones raise cancer risk via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Should you worry about heavy phone use causing cancer?

An Italian court has ruled that heavy cellphone usage was to blame for a man’s tumour. But there is still no convincing evidence that phones raise cancer risk via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Should you worry about heavy phone use causing cancer?

An Italian court has ruled that heavy cellphone usage was to blame for a man’s tumour. But there is still no convincing evidence that phones raise cancer risk via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..