Saturday, 31 December 2016

Fit Tip: Snacking

Eating healthy snacks during the day can help keep the your metabolism going all day and help stop the urge to eat in the evening
via Fitness.com http://eployeeportal.fitness.com/fit_tips.php?id=38.php
Health and Fitness Blog

Fit Tip: Proper Breathing

Breathing correctly while exercising helps ignite the burning of fat
via Fitness.com http://eployeeportal.fitness.com/fit_tips.php?id=36.php
Health and Fitness Blog

Fit Tip: Breathing Athletes

Breathing deeply while exercising results in a 1-2% increase in edge among most athletes
via Fitness.com http://eployeeportal.fitness.com/fit_tips.php?id=37.php
Health and Fitness Blog

Fit Tip: Anaerobic Exercise

Anaerobic exercises are usually done in a shorter period of time such as weight lifting, or sprints, and have a lower impact on the cardiovascular system
via Fitness.com http://eployeeportal.fitness.com/fit_tips.php?id=34.php
Health and Fitness Blog

Fit Tip: Eating Breakfast

People who eat breakfast are more likely to maintain a healthy weight and generally feel better throughout the day. Skipping breakfast can put your body into "starvation mode", causing your body to store your next meal as fat
via Fitness.com http://eployeeportal.fitness.com/fit_tips.php?id=35.php
Health and Fitness Blog

Friday, 30 December 2016

Thursday, 29 December 2016

Harry Maceachen and dad on liver transplant

Harry, who caused chaos in the BBC Breakfast studio last year, on his vital transplant. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

'Don't hold it in' - Hatton on depression

Boxer Ricky Hatton opens up about his depression and a suicide attempt. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Art and dementia

Early dementia could be detected in subtle changes in art composition and brushstrokes. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Wednesday, 28 December 2016

Dieter tells how son calling him fat prompted health drive

Lee Parker tells the BBC how he began taking better care of himself after his son told him that he loved him "even though you are fat". via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Top 10 Healthy Food Trends for 2017

Top 10 Healthy Food Trends for 2017 Blog Post

I can't believe 2016 is almost over. It certainly was a big year. Food wise, we saw cauliflower everything, avocado toast start to pitter out (although it's still popular), doughnut shops take hold, and smoothie bowls everywhere. So what's coming up for 2017? I asked EatingWell's editors what healthy food trends they're seeing on the horizon for next year. Here's what we predict will be hot next year.

Bean Pastas

via EatingWell Blogs - All Blog Posts More READ

Tuesday, 27 December 2016

Dutch IVF centre probes suspected sperm mix-up

A Dutch IVF treatment centre says 26 women may have been fertilised by the wrong sperm cells. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Carey Mulligan on dementia and music

Carey Mulligan opens up about how music helps her grandmother's dementia via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Hip pain may be 'hangover from evolution'

Evolution might help explain why humans are prone to shoulder, hip and knee pain, bone experts say. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Monday, 26 December 2016

Doctors confirm 200-year-old diagnosis

Doctors have confirmed a diagnosis made more than 200 years ago by one of medicine's most influential surgeons. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Friday, 23 December 2016

Exercise May Be Real Medicine for Parkinson's Disease

Physical activity helps improve gait and balance, research review finds

HealthDay news image

Source: HealthDay via Exercise and Physical Fitness New Links: MedlinePlus RSS Feed Read More Here..

Final trial results confirm Ebola vaccine provides high protection against disease

Final trial results confirm Ebola vaccine provides high protection against disease via WHO news Read More Here..

Homeless issued with cards saying they are entitled to GP care

And GPs and receptionists reminded that homeless people can register for treatment

Related items from OnMedica

GPs call for more collaborative working
£38.7m boost to cut homelessness
Not tackling infections in homeless could spark epidemics
Doctors warn on rising rates of homelessness
Call for action to tackle ill health of homeless
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Record numbers of NHS staff receive flu vaccine

Over half a million workers vaccinated between September and November

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Flu shot refusers rate jab as unimportant
Nasal spray flu vaccine for children proving effective
Flu vaccination programme extended to thousands more children
Last winter’s death rate halved due to type of flu virus
Flu during pregnancy not linked to child’s autism risk
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Abortion care 'must be reformed'

Too much abortion care is provided outside the NHS

Related items from OnMedica

Domestic violence linked to pregnancy termination
No prosecution of doctors prepared to carry out sex selection abortion
7 million women treated for unsafe abortions per year
Abortion provider put women at risk
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

NHS part of £250m China health trade mission

Deal will bring a state-of-the-art scanning equipment to the UK

Related items from OnMedica

General Practice Chinese style
UK/China fund on antimicrobial resistance to launch
India and China account for a third of global mental health burden
NHS cancer patients still denied treatments available in other countries
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Manchester merges mental health and social care

New organisation could be a model for integration across the UK

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What does it mean to be a Multispecialty Community Provider?
Multispecialty community provider contract options unveiled
Should local leaders pursue devolution deals for health care?
Deal to devolve £6bn NHS and social care budget to Manchester is signed
Greater Manchester presses ahead with devolved health and care services
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

'Lack of qualified workforce in abortion care'

Private clinic abortions have had a "knock-on effect for training" says the editor in chief of family planning journal. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Ebola experimental vaccine is highly effective, trial shows

An experimental vaccine is found to be highly effective against the deadly Ebola virus. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Glimmer of hope

Thalidomide was withdrawn from sale in most countries in 1961 but was still used in the 1980s in Spain. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Brain's party noise filter revealed by recordings

Direct recordings have revealed what happens in our brains as we make sense of speech in a noisy environment, scientists say. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

It’s time to bust the myth that a healthy diet has to be costly

When it comes to deciding if food is good for us, the misleading idea that pricy equals healthy has taken a vice-like grip, warns Anthony Warner via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

On The Pulse - December 2016

‘Drink plenty of fluids’ not always good advice
via OnMedica Blogs Read More Here..

Thursday, 22 December 2016

Eat the Rainbow with This Healthy Hummus Recipe Made 4 Ways!

Eat the Rainbow with This Healthy Hummus Recipe Made 4 Ways! Blog Post

The only thing better than a big bowl of homemade creamy hummus is 4 big bowls of homemade creamy hummus in all the colors of the rainbow. That's right—vibrant, colorful hummus all naturally dyed by vegetables. We're always looking for new ways to eat more veg, and this may be our favorite yet! Roasted red peppers, beets, avocado and cilantro don't just add color, they also add tons of flavor and silkiness to this healthy snacking favorite!

Boy battling leukaemia conducts orchestra

A seven-year-old boy with leukaemia has a wish come true conducting the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

GP pharmacy scheme set for big boost

£100m investment will bring 1,500 clinical pharmacists into GP surgeries

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Role of pharmacists is set to grow and grow
Pharmacists call for more integrated future with GPs
Include pharmacists in general practice team, say patients and carers
Train non-medics to take on some doctors’ work
Give pharmacists more prescribing rights to ease GP burden
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Record numbers leaving A&E without treatment

Doctors warn of another sign that the system is 'overstretched'

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Who knows best when it comes to emergency hospital admissions?
Missed A&E targets reflect cuts in social care and NHS funding
Primary Care Home has positive impact on care and services
Better funding and capacity vital for A&E to survive
Trend to dissuade patients from attending A&E is flawed
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

New multiple sclerosis drug hailed as a 'landmark'

Ocrelizumab kills the cells that assault the myelin sheath and cause nerve damage

Related items from OnMedica

NHS England loses appeal over PreP drugs
Experts call on regulators to revisit nalmefene decision
75% of reappraised CDF drugs approved for NHS
NICE approves extra ‘triple therapy’ drug for diabetes
Antibiotic prescribing continues to spiral
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Obese but healthy? It’s genetic

Three genes may determine the way fat is stored and transported

Related items from OnMedica

Managing obesity in primary care - Part 1
Managing obesity in primary care - Part 2
‘Safest’ BMI has risen by 3.3 over past three decades
Unhealthy lifestyles and poor diets
Weight gain linked to cancer risk
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Nursing leaders update guidance on assisted suicide

New document sets out the differing legal positions across the UK

Related items from OnMedica

Medical school end-of-life care training 'wanting'
Only half of clinicians feel patients’ end-of-life needs are met
Medication focus in new end-of-life guidance
End-of-life care standards not universally high, says regulator
End-of-life care ‘improving’
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Double whammy

Karrie-Ann Hoppe was diagnosed with breast cancer, then she was told she was pregnant. Dealing with both conditions at once was far from easy. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

'Shell-shocked'

Retired clergy face the closure of their Church of England nursing home because it cannot find staff. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

'Amazing difference that little bit of light can make'

NHS England is rolling out bionic implants to 10 blind people, and one man says it changed his life. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Facebook lurking makes you miserable, says study

Spending too long on social media is likely to cause envy and dissatisfaction, suggests a study. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Multiple sclerosis drug is 'landmark'

A drug that alerts the immune system is described as a "landmark" in treating multiple sclerosis. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Wednesday, 21 December 2016

Becoming a mother may change the brain to read baby’s mind

Scans before and after pregnancy have revealed structural changes in areas of the brain important for empathy - changes not seen in new dads via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Health of 'young and old' hit by China smog

People in Beijing in China outline their health concerns at the city's smog problem. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Abortion provider put women at risk

Care Quality Commission found proper consent was not obtained and staff were inadequately trained

Related items from OnMedica

Fourteen NHS abortion clinics in breach of law, regulator finds
Domestic violence linked to pregnancy termination
Abortions suspended at Marie Stopes clinics amid safety fears
7 million women treated for unsafe abortions per year
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Whole grapes are a choking risk for children

Grapes are the third most common cause of food-related choking after hot dogs and sweets

Related items from OnMedica

Infant food linked to risk of type 1 diabetes
Babies who eat rice have higher urinary arsenic levels
Make laundry and dishwasher liquitabs childproof, doctors urge
Recovery position can curb child hospital admissions
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Rotavirus vaccination programme led to fall in GP visits

Estimates suggest 87,000 visits to GPs and hospital emergency departments for gastroenteritis have been avoided

Related items from OnMedica

Flu vaccination programme extended to thousands more children
Last winter’s death rate halved due to type of flu virus
Rotavirus vaccine offered to babies from today
Rotavirus jab linked to sharp drop in admissions
Rotavirus shows big decline since vaccine campaign
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Processed meat linked to worsening asthma symptoms

Four or more servings of processed meat per week linked with highest risk

Related items from OnMedica

Vitamin D supplements reduce severe asthma attacks
Inhalers
Asthma costs UK health service at least £1bn every year
Yoga may relieve asthma symptoms and boost quality of life
Healthy diet linked to lower COPD risk
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

NHS Health Checks have prevented up to 8,400 heart attacks and strokes

Independent review quantifies the impact of the first five years of the programme

Related items from OnMedica

Learning disability health checks
Public Health England defends NHS Health Checks
Over 40s health checks show few benefits
People with mental illness losing out on health checks
NHS Health Checks fail the most deprived, researchers say
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Moderating demand

Can primary care really absorb excess capacity from hospitals?

Related items from OnMedica

GPs, consultants and public back striking juniors
CQC fee hike slammed by GPs and health providers
Staff shortages now outweigh funding fears in NHS
It ‘beggars belief’ that seven-day NHS plans are uncosted, say MPs
Fewer staff in NHS needed to get finances balanced
via OnMedica Blogs Read More Here..

Processed meat 'may be bad for asthma'

Eating lots of ham and sausage might make asthma symptoms worse, according to French researchers. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Tuesday, 20 December 2016

Antibiotic resistance will hit a terrible tipping point in 2017

Soon more antibiotics will be consumed by animals than by people – causing the resistance of bacteria to antibiotics to accelerate via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

New non-surgical treatment for early prostate cancer shows promise

Vascular targeted photodynamic therapy derived from bacteria on the ocean floor

Related items from OnMedica

'Network drugs' could beat aggressive prostate cancer
Scientists find five different types of prostate cancer
Statins may slow prostate cancer progression in advanced disease
New risk estimation for prostate cancer improves accuracy
Radiotherapy for prostate cancer linked to increased risk of secondary cancers
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

UK must retain and attract ‘scientific talent’ post Brexit, insist Peers

Essential to ensure UK has prominent place in global economy

Related items from OnMedica

Brexit and cancer research
Former NHS chief executive says Brexit poses a threat to NHS
Don’t let Brexit scupper UK drug discovery and delivery, MPs told
Exempt EU scientists already in UK from immigration curbs, urge MPs
Offer European NHS workers ‘automatic’ British citizenship
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Rise in hospital activity outstripping NHS funding

Real-terms budget increases have shrunk to 1.2% amid annual increases in demand

Related items from OnMedica

Social care directors warn of funding crisis
NHS struggling as bed occupancy rates soar
Sustainability and Transformation Plans
Small Translucent Penguins
NHS unprepared for winter pressure, say doctors
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Send ‘harmful drinkers’ for liver disease scans, GPs urged

Draft NICE quality standard aims to boost detection of cirrhosis and cancer

Related items from OnMedica

Alcohol and the nervous system
England faces 135,000 alcohol-related cancer deaths by 2035
A fifth of over-65s are drinking too much
Foetal alcohol syndrome must be better recognised
Exercise might partly compensate for drinking alcohol
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Nurse leaders blame government for drop in nursing degree applicants

Applications in England have fallen 20% compared with this time last year

Related items from OnMedica

Anger as government axes nurse and midwife bursaries
Will removing bursaries for student nurses actually lead to more nursing staff?
Nurses to gain formal recognition for enhanced skills
Public believe many more nurses needed for safe care
Nurses 'unable to afford basic necessities'
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

'Pregnancy fluid' reverses ageing bones

Cells in the fluid that surrounds a baby in the womb can revive ageing and weak bones, say scientists. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Now that’s what I call Christmas

Despite the reasons to go 'bah humbug', patients' gratitude can make things better

Related items from OnMedica

BMA calls for maximum number of patients per GP
GMC warns of 'state of unease' amongst doctors
To improve GP access, we all need to step out of the trenches
Hunt ‘never planned to insist on changes to existing contracts’
Primary Care Home has positive impact on care and services
via OnMedica Blogs Read More Here..

Nick Grimshaw visits Cancer Research UK

Nick Grimshaw gets a rare tour of a cancer lab to meet the experts who are trying to cure the disease via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Codeine becomes prescription-only medicine in Australia

Painkillers containing codeine will need a prescription in Australia from 2018 amid concerns over misuse. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Prostate cancer laser treatment 'truly transformative'

Surgeons describe a new treatment for early stage prostate cancer as "truly transformative". via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Blood test for hidden heart disease

A cheap blood test can predict which apparently healthy patients are at high risk of a heart attack. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Monday, 19 December 2016

Pregnancy alters woman's brain 'for at least two years'

'Pregnancy brain' exists, but not in the way you might think, scientists say. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Becoming a mother may change the brain to read baby’s mind

Scans before and after pregnancy have revealed structural changes in areas of the brain important for empathy - changes not seen in new dads via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Tweet with flashing images sent to epileptic writer

Vanity Fair writer Kurt Eichenwald suffered a seizure after receiving a flashing image tweet via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

MPs say UK suicide rate ‘unacceptably high’

NHS managers funding delays are stalling improvements to mental health services

Related items from OnMedica

Those bereaved through suicide, at risk of doing the same
Falling suicide rate linked to improving NHS mental health care
Commit to ‘zero suicides’ Deputy PM urges NHS
Mental health deaths rise by over 20%
Child mental health funding not reaching CCGs
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

NHS struggling as bed occupancy rates soar

Think tank reveals hospitals are running out of beds over the winter

Related items from OnMedica

Emergency care already facing greater ‘winter pressures’ than last year
NHS unprepared for winter pressure, say doctors
MPs call for renewed action on discharge delays
Psychiatric patients ‘discharged too early’
Use billions wasted on bed-blocking to bolster residential care, urges think tank
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Health safety investigation plans need more work

Indemnity experts say proposals for ‘safe-space’ are high on rhetoric

Related items from OnMedica

I am a CEO and I make mistakes
Tired GPs greatest threat to patient safety
Poor communication tops complaints list again
New guidance spells out doctors’ duty of candour to admit mistakes
Treatment of whistleblowers a “stain on NHS”, say MPs
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

UK HIV diagnosis rates twice as high as western Europe

Annual HIV report says over 13,000 people unaware they are infected

Related items from OnMedica

Preventing HIV
NHS England loses appeal over PreP drugs
GPs should offer HIV tests in routine appointments
HIV prevention scheme gets extension
UN achieves HIV treatment target 9 months early
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Send heavy drinkers for liver scan, GPs told

Women who drink more than three-and-a-half bottles of wine a week should get their livers checked, say guidelines. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

RCGP calls for improvements to out-of-hours care

But extended weekend and evening opening will not solve access problems
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Suicide: We must end isolation, says campaigner

A woman whose husband took his own life says people should be encouraged to talk more about suicide, as a group of MPs say more should be done to support those at risk. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Scientists won’t stop discovering stuff, no matter what

2016 often felt like a jaw-dropping year where the unexpected and impossible kept on happening. Welcome to our world, say scientists via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Sugary drinks tax 'will benefit children most'

The planned tax on sugary drinks could see UK obesity numbers fall by tens of thousands, a study says. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Mum troll fighter

Mothers fight back against memes mocking their terminally ill children. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Night riders

Across the UK, volunteer motorcyclists help the NHS by delivering blood. What motivates them? via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Sunday, 18 December 2016

Saturday, 17 December 2016

Heimlich manoeuvre inventor dies

US doctor who invented the Heimlich manoeuvre used to help victims of choking dies, aged 96 via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

WHO calls for urgent resumption of medical evacuations from besieged east Aleppo

The World Health Organization is calling for medical evacuation of the sick and injured from east Aleppo to be resumed as quickly as possible. Almost 200 patients were safely transferred to hospitals in western rural Aleppo, Idlib and Turkey before all evacuations were aborted this morning, leaving many more in need of medical care stranded. via WHO news Read More Here..

Friday, 16 December 2016

Pokemon Go, Pokemon Gone

Study found the virtual reality game got adults moving -- but only for a while
Source: HealthDay via Exercise and Physical Fitness New Links: MedlinePlus RSS Feed Read More Here..

Minutes Count in the Cleveland Clinic Florida Emergency Room: Patient Story

"A Florida woman is rushed to the emergency room with life-threatening injuries and only minutes to live. Experience her story as the Cleveland Clinic Florida Emergency Department team springs into action to save her":



Disclaimer: I work at Cleveland Clinic Florida, but I am not paid for this post.

via CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog More READ

WHO celebrates achievements in 2016, despite global health challenges

WHO Director-General, Dr Chan's end of the year statement for 2016 via WHO news Read More Here..

UK soft drinks industry levy will have significant health benefits for children

Modelling by researchers shows that the levy will reduce obesity, diabetes and tooth decay in children

Related items from OnMedica

Childhood obesity plan attacked as 'weak' and 'watered down'
Get tough on curbing children’s poor dental health, government urged
Fruit drinks for children have ‘unacceptably high’ sugar levels
Child type 2 diabetes is a ‘wake-up call’ to the nation
Children order fast food from schools, report shows
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

CCGs have a long way to go on GP access

Fewer than half provide the ‘full’ access required by 2019 anywhere in their area

Related items from OnMedica

Tired GPs greatest threat to patient safety
GP access plans ‘based on flawed information’
Most patients happy with GPs – and opening hours
BMA calls for maximum number of patients per GP
Primary Care Home has positive impact on care and services
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

NHS England announces funding for vanguards

£101m of new funding now available for new care models

Related items from OnMedica

Innovative use of technology key to improving patient outcomes
GPs link to new emergency ‘vanguard’ sites
Ealing’s integrated care journey: learning from international models
Pressure makes diamonds
Sustainability and Transformation Plans
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

The toddler saved from meningitis on Christmas Day

Viki Cooper tells the Victoria Derbyshire programme about her son Ben's fight for life after suffering from meningitis. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Mitochondrial donation gets go ahead in England

NHS England announces it will fund ground-breaking clinical trial of the technique

Related items from OnMedica

Personalised test could fine tune IVF treatment
Three-person IVF is ethical, report says
Lords approve mitochondrial donation
First UK approval for gene editing on human embryos
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Herpes virus linked to most common type of childhood cancer

Congenital cytomegalovirus infection may increase risk of developing acute lymphocytic leukemia

Related items from OnMedica

Cold sore virus could kill cancer
New guidelines on managing genital herpes in pregnancy
Scientists find genetic signature linked to leukaemia
Breastfeeding could cut children’s leukaemia risk
Prophylactic antibiotics help children with leukaemia
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Antibiotic resistance will hit a terrible tipping point in 2017

Soon more antibiotics will be consumed by animals than by people – causing the resistance of bacteria to antibiotics to accelerate via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Six pharmaceutical firms accused of price-fixing

US authorities accuse six makers of generic drugs of fixing the price of antibiotics and a diabetes medicine. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Australian court increases fine over 'misleading' Nurofen

The UK manufacturer of Nurofen is hit with an increased fine for misleading customers in Australia. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Babies made from three people approved in UK

Babies made from two women and one man win approval from the UK's fertility regulator. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Let’s hope UK’s soft drink tax cuts obesity and diabetes rates

Significant health improvements from a planned UK tax on sugary drinks have been predicted in a study. Hopefully  they will come to pass, says Paul Aveyard via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

NHS staff do mannequin challenge

The BBC set of Casualty hosts off-duty doctors and nurses for a mannequin challenge. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Thursday, 15 December 2016

Ex-soldier shows BBC secrets behind his style

A veteran, who lost both legs in Afghanistan, shows the BBC the secrets behind his style. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Three-person babies approved in UK

Hannah Smith is one of those that will benefit the decision to allow babies made from two women and one man. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

UK becomes first country to give go ahead to three-parent babies

The country’s regulator has decided the procedure is safe enough to approve and will now consider applications to use the technique on a case-by-case basis via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Protein in urine linked to increased risk of memory problems

Chronic kidney disease and dementia share many risk factors, researchers point out

Related items from OnMedica

Constipation linked to kidney disease
Dementia now leading cause of death in England and Wales
Memory clinic referral criteria delay diagnosis
'Watch and wait' might be better in advanced kidney cancer
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

MRI scan provides more certainty in diagnosing foetal abnormalities

Researchers propose MRI scan be offered when foetus has a suspected brain abnormality

Related items from OnMedica

Blood test identifies high-risk lupus pregnancies
Experts find ‘substantial’ variation in maternity care
‘Red flag’ unwell pregnant women to curb maternal deaths, clinicians told
‘Morning sickness’ linked to lower risk of pregnancy loss
New guidelines on epilepsy in pregnancy
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Dr Halfdan T. Mahler, WHO’s third Director-General, dies at 93

WHO is saddened by the death of Dr Halfdan T. Mahler on XX December 2016. Dr Mahler served as Director-General of WHO from 1973-1988. via WHO news Read More Here..

Woman gives birth thanks to ovary removed when she was eight

For the first time, a woman has had a child using tissue removed and frozen while she was still a child – a technique that could young people with cancer via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Marital history linked to stroke survival

Stroke survival is highest for married people who have never been divorced or widowed

Related items from OnMedica

Depression risk much higher for three months after stroke
RCGP defends ‘under-prescription’ of stroke medicines by GPs
Lifestyle factors biggest cause of heart disease risk variation
NICE wants GPs to prevent 8,000 strokes a year
Stroke can often be avoided, claims study
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Fewer children smoking and drinking

Number aged 8 to 15 who have ever tried alcohol reaches lowest level ever in annual Health Survey

Related items from OnMedica

Absentee parent link to smoking and drinking before adolescence
Stats show decline in harmful drinking among young
Smoke-free laws have cut child hospital admissions
Young people’s regular use of e-cigarettes still low
Commission more teen mental health and alcohol services
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Long use of pain relievers associated with hearing loss

Women who use ibuprofen or acetaminophen for 6 years or more have higher risk of hearing loss

Related items from OnMedica

Regular aspirin use linked to blindness
NSAIDs and COX 2s linked to heart failure admission
Some common painkillers can raise heart risks
No role for paracetamol in treating pain in osteoarthritis
Common painkiller used by mums-to-be linked to children’s behavioural issues
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

The woman with Down's ... and a cookie business

Collette Divitto was fed up of being told she 'wasn't the right fit' for jobs, so she started her own cookie business. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

'I gave too much' - man who ran 401 marathons

Ben Smith tells the BBC how his mental health has been affected after running 401 marathons in 401 days. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Extra baby scan 'spots brain problems'

Detailed MRI scans should be offered to some women in pregnancy to help spot brain defects in the developing baby, say researchers. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

'Three-person baby' decision awaited

The UK's fertility regulator is making a historic decision on creating babies from three people. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Wednesday, 14 December 2016

Viruses may have evolved to hit men hard but go easy on women

Many infections give men worse symptoms. Mathematical models suggest this could be because women can pass infections on to others in several extra ways via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Antibacterial products may help bacteria beat antibiotics

The antibacterial agent triclosan is often present in anything from cleaning products to toys, but tests suggest it can help MRSA survive antibiotics via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Vapers experimenting with illegal drugs bought on the dark web

As sellers on the dark web advertise drug-infused e-liquids, researchers investigate the trend for vaping substances like heroin and methamphetamine via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Low-carb diets appear to be safe for short-term use

Analysis also reveals low-carb diets are slightly more effective for weight loss than low-fat diets

Related items from OnMedica

Managing obesity in primary care - Part 1
Managing obesity in primary care - Part 2
Call for nutritional ‘traffic light’ labels to be mandatory
Nutrition more important than calories, say experts
Experts call for food to have 'activity' labelling
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Brain tests predict children's futures

Brain tests at the age of three appear to predict a child's future success in life, according to researchers. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

'Gender-biased infections' may exist

Viruses can evolve to become more aggressive in men than in women, at least in theory. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Snapchat spectacles worn by UK surgeon while operating

A UK surgeon has broadcast an operation using Snap spectacles in a world first. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Scotland to reform approval process for rare and end-of-life drugs

Scottish Government announces reform as a review of access to new medicines is published

Related items from OnMedica

Pharmaceutical industry regulation undermines NICE drugs appraisal work
Sweeping changes to Scottish drug approval system
MPs slam government for its poor management of Cancer Drugs Fund
Plan to speed up drug approval process
75% of reappraised CDF drugs approved for NHS
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Statins may influence risk of Alzheimer’s

Risk reduction depends on specific statin and ethnicity and sex of patient

Related items from OnMedica

US doctor says FDA should have withdrawn rosuvastatin
Detection bias may be behind memory loss with statins
Statins might not cut colorectal cancer risk after all
Major review clears statins
US expert group updates statins recommendations
via OnMedica News Read More Here..

Two years of silence

The invention helping me use my voice again after two years without speaking. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Full impact of devastated health services in north-eastern Nigeria revealed by WHO report

Full impact of devastated health services in north-eastern Nigeria revealed by WHO report via WHO news Read More Here..

WHO steps up response in Aleppo and demands that health personnel be protected

Conditions in Aleppo continue to deteriorate as thousands of people flee violence. WHO alongside UN and other partners, is working to provide care in the midst of conflict and to assist internally displaced people (IDPs). The Organization strongly urges all parties to the conflict in Syria to abide by international humanitarian law and protect civilians trapped in the conflict. In particular, WHO demands that all patients and health workers, facilities and vehicles be protected from violence during times of conflict.

WHO has delivered 12 medical shipments of life-saving medicines and medical supplies to the stricken city, sufficient to treat more than 290 000 patients. The medical supplies distributed to 11 public hospitals and 23 primary health care centres, include trauma and surgical supplies, hygiene kits, IV fluids, antibiotics, chronic disease, psychotropic and paediatric medicines, as well as other essential medical equipment. via WHO news Read More Here..

NICE recommends old-fashioned temperature check over other methods

Infrared ear thermometers and forehead strips should not be used before, during or after surgery
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'Dog saliva almost killed me'

David Money was in a coma for six weeks after a dog lick led to a rare infection, but he says he won't give up his dogs. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Over a third of GPs in Scotland plan to retire in the next five years

Retirement plans revealed in workforce survey conducted by the BMA

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Pokemon Go: Exercise impact 'short-lived'

Research suggests playing Pokemon Go only had a short-term impact on players' increased activity. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Tuesday, 13 December 2016

Antibacterial products may help bacteria beat antibiotics

The antibacterial agent triclosan is often present in anything from cleaning products to toys, but tests suggest it can help MRSA survive antibiotics via New Scientist - Health Read More Here..

Viruses may have evolved to hit men hard but go easy on women

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Sniff Out Alzheimer’s Risk with Powerful New Smell Test

A provocative new report suggests a low-cost, non-invasive testing protocol may identify older individuals at increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators discovered testing individuals’ ability to recognize, remember and distinguish between odors provided similar recommendations as genetic, imaging, and more detailed memory tests.

The report — suggesting testing of both olfactory and cognitive abilities as a means to designate candidates for treatments designed to halt or slow Alzheimer’s symptom development — has been published online in Annals of Neurology.

Mark Albers, M.D., Ph.D., of the MGH Department of Neurology, the principal investigator and corresponding author of the report says:

“There is increasing evidence that the neurodegeneration behind Alzheimer’s disease starts at least 10 years before the onset of memory symptoms. The development of a digitally-enabled, affordable, accessible, and non-invasive means to identify healthy individuals who are at risk is a critical step to developing therapies that slow down or halt Alzheimer’s disease progression.”

It is well-known that brain circuits that process olfactory information can be affected by Alzheimer’s disease, and several studies have documented a diminished ability to identify odors in affected individuals.

Other studies have associated deficits in odor identification with established Alzheimer’s disease biomarkers and with greater rates of cognitive decline. However, the most commonly used test of olfactory ability — the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test — has a number of limitations and does not take into account the great variation in olfactory ability among healthy individuals.

In the research the MGH team used a battery of four tests to addresses both olfactory and cognitive functions:

  • In the OPID (Odor Percept IDentification)-10 test, participants are presented with a battery of 10 odors — menthol, clove, leather, strawberry, lilac, pineapple, smoke, soap, grape, or lemon. After experiencing each odor for two seconds, they are asked whether the scent is familiar and then asked to choose among four words — from the names listed above — for the one that best describes the odor.
  • Participants then complete the Odor Awareness Scale (OAS), a previously validated questionnaire that assesses their overall attention to environmental odors and how they are affected emotionally and behaviorally by scents.
  • The OPID-20 test includes the 10 odors previously presented and an additional 10 — banana, garlic, cherry, baby powder, grass, fruit punch, peach, chocolate, dirt, and orange. Participants are first asked whether a presented odor was included in the OPID-10 test and then asked which word best describes the odor. Their ability to remember odors from the first test determines their POEM (Percepts of Odor Episodic Memory) score.
  • In the Odor Discrimination (OD) test, participants are presented with two consecutive odors and asked whether they were different or the same, a process that is repeated 12 times with different paired scents.

The study recruited 183 participants, most of whom were enrolled in ongoing studies at the MGH-based Massachusetts Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center.

At the time of the olfactory testing, 70 were cognitively normal, 74 tested normal on cognitive tests but were personally concerned about their cognitive abilities, 29 had mild cognitive impairment, and 10 had been diagnosed with possible or probable Alzheimer’s disease.

As part of the studies they were enrolled in, all of them had comprehensive medical and neurological examinations — including annual tests of their memory and cognitive abilities — and several had brain imaging studies of Alzheimer’s-associated factors.

Results of the OPID-20 test significantly differentiated among the four groups of participants, and those results correlated with the thinning of two brain regions — the hippocampus and the entorhinal cortex — previously associated with Alzheimer’s risk.

Participants’ ability to remember a previously presented aroma, as reflected in the POEM score, also showed significant differences between the two cognitively normal groups and participants with Alzheimer’s disease, whose results were no better than chance.

Because the ability of normal individuals to recognize and discriminate between odors can vary by as much as 40 times, the POEM scores of the two cognitively normal groups were compared with what would have been predicted based on their ability to identify and differentiate between odors, as reflected in the OAS and OD tests.

That comparison determined whether each individual was a good or poor POEM performer, and poor POEM performers were more likely to have the variant of the APOE gene associated with increased Alzheimer’s risk. While results of an annual test of short-term memory improved year-to-year for the good POEM performers, no such improvement was seen among the poor performers, who also showed thinning of the entorhinal cortex.

Albers and his colleagues are currently recruiting participants for a larger-scale study to validate these results:

“It is well recognized that early diagnosis and intervention are likely to produce the most effective therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease — preventing the onset or the progression of symptoms. If these results hold up, this sort of inexpensive, noninvasive screening could help us identify the best candidates for novel therapies to prevent the development of symptoms of this tragic disease.”

This guest article originally appeared on PsychCentral.com: Sniff Test May Detect Risk for Alzheimer’s by Rick Nauert PhD.

REFERENCES

Dhilla Albers, A., Asafu-Adjei, J., Delaney, M.K., Kelly, K.E., Gomez-Isla, T., Blacker, D., Johnson, K.A., Sperling, R.A., Hyman, B.T., Betensky, R.A., Hastings, L. and Albers, M.W. (2016) ‘Episodic memory of odors stratifies Alzheimer biomarkers in normal elderly’, Annals of Neurology, . doi: 10.1002/ana.24792.

Image via MarionF / Pixabay.

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Tourette's tics

Jess Thom, who has Tourette's syndrome, on why theatres should relax about noise. via BBC News - Health Read More Here..

Malaria control improves for vulnerable in Africa, but global progress off-track

WHO’s World Malaria Report 2016 reveals that children and pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa have greater access to effective malaria control. via WHO news Read More Here..

£300,000 NHS dialysis unit fraudsters jailed

Manager and contractors charged Epsom and St Helier Trust for bogus work

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